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Thursday, 14 December 2017

630) Unicorn of Scotland: Second Coin in "The Queen's Beasts Coin Series", UK: Gold and Silver Bullion Coins kick-started by the Royal Mint, UK in March 2016: Unicorn Coins minted in 2017:

630) Unicorn of Scotland: Second Coin in "The Queen's Beasts Coin Series", UK: Gold and Silver Bullion Coins kick-started by the Royal Mint, UK in March 2016: Unicorn Coins minted in 2017:


The"Queen's Beasts Coin Series": The Unicorn of Scotland:


The Royal Mint, UK began on 29.03.2016, a new Coin Series titled  "The Queen's Beasts" featuring both mythical and real beasts that have featured on British heraldry over the last five centuries.

 
Spanning back to the reign of King Henry VIII, "The King’s Beasts" are a group of creatures that symbolize the various strands of royal ancestry brought together as a heraldic badge.


This Coin series will include all ten of these creatures, which recall hundreds of years of British royal heraldry and will showcase one ‘beast’ at a time.


The Reverse of the Unicorn Silver Bullion coin , with a  Unicorn sculture placed in the background


The Unicorn of Scotland is the second creature to appear on the Royal Mint’s commemorative “Queen’s Beasts Coin Series” .

The unicorn sculpture created by renowned sculptor James Woodford (1893–1976) for the coronation ceremony of Queen Elizabeth II, held in Westminster Abbey in 1953.

James VI of Scotland became James I of England after he succeeded the childless Elizabeth I in 1603, thus uniting the thrones for the first time.

He took the Lion of England and one of the Scottish Unicorns as supporters for the Royal Arms, and they have remained in place ever since.

The origin of the unicorn as a regular supporter of the Scottish arms is obscured in the mist of time, but since the 15th century it has been associated with Scotland, where it was struck on gold coins called “unicorns” for their design of a unicorn supporting the Scottish shield.

The Unicorn of Scotland, milky-white in colour with golden hooves, horn, and mane, has always had a coronet around its neck like a collar, with a gold chain attached. The chains were symbolic representations of the "great beast" having been tamed to serve the King. As with most chained beasts in heraldry, its strength is emphasised rather than diminished by the shackles. The Unicorn holds the Royal coat of Scotland, with a red lion rampant (the most fierce stance) on a gold background as Supporters of the Arms, an image which has been unchanged since Alexander III.

The beasts and both real and mythical—including griffins, lions, dragons, and falcons, which have stood guard throughout hundreds of years of British royal heraldry—can be seen all around the Queen’s realm in some surprisingly ordinary places in the daily lives of Britons, from pub signs to passports and city badges to sport.

The Queen's beasts present day:

At the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, ten heraldic beasts stood guard. They were sculpted by James Woodford RA for the coronation ceremony held in Westminster Abbey in 1953, and each stands six feet tall.

 Each proud beast, used as a heraldic badge by generations that went before her, was inspired by the King's Beasts of Henry VIII that still line the bridge over the moat at his Hampton Court Palace. 

Presently, the original Queen's Beasts can be found at the Canadian Museum of History in Quebec, while Portland stone replicas, also carved by James Woodford, watch over Kew Gardens in the United Kingdom.

These mythical and ancient creatures include - the Lion of England, Unicorn of Scotland, Griffin of Edward III, Falcon of the Plantagenets, Black Bull of Clarence, Yale of Beauforts, White Greyhound of Richmond, Red Dragon of Wales, White Lion of Mortimer and White Horse of Hanover. 



The Reverse and Obverse faces of the Unicorn of Scotland coin against the backdrop of the British Flag

An image of both faces of the 100 Pounds Gold  depicting the Unicorn of Scotland on its Reverse

The Obverse design of the 25 Pounds Gold Coin bears the fifth portrait of the Queen, which was also designed by Jody Clark (his initials "JC" appear below the Queen's neck) and introduced on British coinage in March 2015. It bears the inscription on the periphery from left to right:" 100 POUNDS. ELIZABETH II. DG. REG. FD" (meaning "Elizabeth II, By the Grace of God, Queen").

The Reverse design of the 100 Pounds Gold Coin includes the Unicorn of Scotland. The text "UNICORN OF SCOTLAND" along with the weight "1 OZ", metal "FINE GOLD.9999", and year of issue "2017" appear on the outer periphery.

The Gold coins come in four different denominations:

The specifications of the £25 Gold Coin are as under:
Denomination: £25 or 25 Pounds; Metal Composition: .9999 Gold (Au); Weight: 7.8 grams; Diameter/Size: 22.0 mm; Coin Quality: Proof; Mintage: 1,500 pieces; Mint: Royal Mint, UK; Year of issue: 2017.


The Specifications of this coin are:

Denomination: £100; Metal Composition: .9999 Gold (Au); Weight: 31.21 grams; Diameter/Size: 32.69 mm; Obverse and Reverse designer: Jody Clark; Coin Quality: Proof; Year of issue: 2017. Mintage: 475 pieces; Mint: Royal Mint, UK.

Denomination: £500; Metal Composition: .9999 Gold (Au); Weight: 156.295 grams or 5 Oz; Diameter/Size: 50.0 mm; Obverse and Reverse designer: Jody Clark; Coin Quality: Proof; Year of issue: 2017. Mintage: 85 pieces; Mint: Royal Mint, UK.

Denomination: £1,000 or 1,000 Pounds; Metal Composition: .9999 Gold (Au); Weight: 1,005.0 grams; Diameter/Size: 100.0 mm; Obverse and Reverse designer: Jody Clark; Coin Quality: Proof; Year of issue: 2017. Mintage: As per order; Mint: Royal Mint, UK.



The Reverse design of the 5 Pounds Silver Coin includes the Unicorn of Scotland. The text "UNICORN OF SCOTLAND" along with the year of issue "2017" appear on the outer periphery.

The reverse designs are based upon the extraordinary sculptures created by renowned sculptor James Woodford (1893–1976) for the coronation ceremony of Queen Elizabeth II, held in Westminster Abbey in 1953 and designed by Jody Clark, whose initials "JC" appear  to the left of the Unicorn.


The Obverse design of the 5 Pounds Silver Coin bears the fifth portrait of the Queen, which was also designed by Jody Clark (his initials "JC" appear below the Queen's neck) and introduced on British coinage in March 2015. It bears the inscription on the periphery from left to right:" 5 POUNDS. ELIZABETH II. DG. REG.FID DEF" (meaning "Elizabeth II, By the Grace of God, Queen").

The Silver coins come in four different denominations:

Denomination: £500; Metal Composition: .9999 Silver (Ag); Weight: 1,005.0 grams; Diameter/Size: 100.0 mm; Obverse and Reverse designer: Jody Clark; Coin Quality: Proof; Year of issue: 2017. Mintage: 225 pieces; Mint: Royal Mint, UK.

Denomination: £10; Metal Composition: .9999 Silver (Ag); Weight: 313.0 grams; Diameter/Size: 65.0 mm; Obverse and Reverse designer: Jody Clark; Coin Quality: Proof; Year of issue: 2017. Mintage: 850 pieces; Mint: Royal Mint, UK.

Denomination: £10; Metal Composition: .9999 Silver (Ag); Weight: 156.29 grams; Diameter/Size: 65.0 mm; Obverse and Reverse designer: Jody Clark; Coin Quality: Proof; Year of issue: 2017. Mintage: 750 pieces; Mint: Royal Mint, UK.

Denomination: £2; Metal Composition: .9999 Silver (Ag); Weight: 31.2 grams; Diameter/Size: 38.6 mm; Obverse and Reverse designer: Jody Clark; Coin Quality: Proof; Year of issue: 2017. Mintage: 6,250 pieces; Mint: Royal Mint, UK.
The Silver and Gold coins are housed in a protective plastic flip. Orders of 25 or more coins come in tubes. Orders of 500 coins or more are packaged in Monster Boxes (20 tubes per box).
A Base Metal Coin (Cupro-Nickel) also joins the Series/Pack:

The "Unicorn of Scotland" is also captured on this £5  Cupro-Nickel coin which has been finished to Brilliant Uncirculated Quality. 
The Cupro-Nickel £5 coin comes in an elegant jacket. The "designer" Unicorn picture on top looks like an "under-fed/undernourished" Unicorn who hasn't been fed for days on end, unlike his representation of the coin.

The Specifications of this coin are:
Denomination: £5; Metal Composition: Cupro-Nickel; Weight: 28.28 grams; Diameter/Size: 38.61 mm; Obverse and Reverse designer: Jody Clark; Coin Quality: Brilliant Uncirculated; Year of issue: 2017.Mintage: 6,250 pieces; Mint: Royal Mint, UK.






Links to some other interesting posts:
Central Bank of Ireland issues:

1) Jonathan Swift: 350 th Birth Anniversary 15 Euro Silver Proof coin features his most famous work "Gulliver's Travels" : Coin issued on 30.11.2017


Bank of England Banknotes:

1) A Ten Pounds Banknote issued on Charles Dickens (Writer) also depicting a cricket match from his novel "The Pickwick Papers"

2) A Ten Pound Banknote issued on Charles Darwin (English Naturalist) also depicting the HMS Beagle, Darwin's magnifying glass, a humming-bird & flora that he may have seen on his voyage.

3) A Five Pounds Banknote issued on George Stephenson (an Engineer) also depicting "Rocket" his Railway Locomotive and Skeene Bridge on theStockton Darlington Railway (1825) - since withdrawn


4) A 20 Pounds Banknote issued on Michael Faraday (a Scientist) issued in 1991, since withdrawn from circulation in 2001 


5) Great Britain's first circulating polymer Banknote on Winston Churchill issued by the Bank of England in the denomination of 5 Pounds on 13.09.2016


6) Jane Austen: features on the second circulating Polymer Banknote of 10 Pounds denomination to be released on 14.09.2017

Inspirations from Scottish History (Clydesdale Bank Banknotes): 

1) The Legend of King Bruce & the Spider on Banknotes
  
2) Commemorating Sir William Arrol and his creation the Forth Rail Bridge by issues of Britain's first ever 5 Pound Polymer Banknote

Banknotes from Bank of Scotland:

1) The Ryder Cup Commemorative Banknote: A 5 Pounds Banknote issued by the Royal Bank of Scotland in 2014 

British Crown Dependencies:

1) Specimen Banknotes from the States of Jersey

2) Coinage and Currency from the States of Jersey

3) Currency & Coinage of the Bailiwick of Guernsey

4) Currency & Coinage of Gibraltar : An Overseas Territory of Great Britain

5) Coinage of Gibraltar: (A British Overseas Territory): An Uncirculated Decimal Coin Collection Set minted by the Tower Mint, UK in 2010
  
6) The Isle of Man: An Uncirculated Decimal Coin Collection Set minted by Pobjoy Mint, UK in 2015

7) The Centenary of the ill-fated Titanic (15.04.1912 - 15.04.2012): An Alderney Five Pound Coin Commemorating the Maritime Legend

8) "Man of Steel": A Superman Movie: A set of stamps brought out in 2013 by Jersey post, the States of Jersey, commemorating Henry William Dalgliesh Cavill who played Superman in the Movie

9) Coins & Currency of Bermuda

10) The Bailiwick of Jersey - Presently circulating coinage - Pounds and Pence 

11) St. Helena & Ascension Islands: An Uncirculated Coin Set from 2003 

12) The Legend of the "HMAV Bounty" is interwoven with the heritage of the Pitcairn Islands: An uncirculated coin set from Pitcairn Islands in 2009 depicting the icons/relics of the Bounty minted by the New Zealand Mint

13) Currency of the Falkland Islands: A British Overseas Territory (BOT) Pounds & Pence

14) Falkland Islands Penguins: 50 Pence Coin Series: The first Coin in the Series of four coins: the Rock-Hopper Penguin 

15) Falkland Islands Penguins: 50 Pence Coin Series: The Gentoo Penguin:Second Coin in the series of four coins issued on 20.06.2017 


16) Falkland Islands Penguins: 50 Pence Coin Series: The Third Coin in the Series of four coins: the King Penguin

Famous Battles

1) Bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo and Napoleon's Exile to St. Helena: (Part I): A One Crown Commemorative coin issued by the Ascension Island (minted by Pobjoy Mint UK) 

2) Bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo and Napoleon's Exile to st. Helena: (Part II) 1) A 5 GBP Coin issued by the Royal Mint UK. 2) A"Drie Landen Zilverset" ( ot the "Three Lands Silver set") containing coins issued by the Royal Dutch Mint including coins of Netherlands, Belgium and UK

3) Commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain by issuing a 50 Pence coin by the Royal Mint UK

Gold Coins:
  
1) Gold Sovereigns issued in 2013 & 2014 by MMTC-PAMP in India under licence from the Royal Mint, UK, carrying the "I" Mint Mark

2) Gold Half-Sovereigns minted by MMTC-PAMP in India in 2014 under licence from the Royal Mint UK bearing the "I" Mint Mark 

Silver Coins:

1) A 20 Pound Silver coin minted for the first timr by the royal Mint UK: reverse design carries the famous St. George slaying the dragon design found on Gold Sovereigns 

British India Coinage:

 1) East India Company Quarter Anna Copper Coin which is one of the first issues under the Coinage Act 1835

2) Victoria Coinage: When she was Queen and afterwards Empress

3) Edward VII: King & Emperor  Coinage

4) George V King Emperor Coinage

5) George VI: The last of the British India Emperors Coinage 

Other British Royalty: 

1) Queen Elizabeth II's Diamond Jubilee Celebrations (1952-2012): A Five Pound Commemorative coin issued by the Royal Mint, UK

2) Commemorating Queen Elizabeth II's Coronation in 1953: A Five Pound Coin minted by the Royal Mint UK in 2013, depicting the Imperial State Crown

3) The Royal Coat of Arms of the UK: Great British 2012 Coin Set (Uncirculated) issued by the Royal Mint UK

4) Prince George's Christening Ceremony celebrated with coins issued by the Royal Mint UK in 2013

5) The British Empire:  A Case of Numismatic "segregation": (Guest Post by Rahul Kumar)

6) 1) The Portrait Collection: Various Portraits of Queen Elizabeth II on Coinage 2) The Fourth & Final Circulating coinage of the Portrait designed by Ian Rank-Broadley and the First Edition of the portrait of the Queen made by Jody Clark

 British Coinage:

1) The contribution of the Great British One-Pound coins in keeping alive the historical legends/emblems/heritage of the UK (1983 onwards)

2) Transformation of a Five shilling Coin (Crown) into the UK Twenty-five Pence & then the Five Pound Coin

3) Transformation of the Two Shilling Coin (Florin) Coin into the UK Ten Pence

4) The 350th Anniversary of the Guinea: A Two Pound Coin issued by the Royal Mint UK celebrating the milestone

5) The new 12-sided One Pound UK Coin introduced into circulation on 28.03.2017

 Commemorative British Coinage:

 1) Commemorating the Bicentenary of Charles Dickens: A Two pound coin celebrating his literary contributions during the Victorian Era

 2) Commemorating 50 Years of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) - presently called the World Wide Fund for Nature by issue of a Fifty Pence coin by the Royal Mint, UK

3) Coins commemorating London Olympics & Paralympics (2012)

4) Commemorating 150 Years of the London Underground : Two pound Coins minted by the Royal Mint UK, showing the "Roundel" logo and a train emerging from a tunnel 

5) Commemorating the 100th Birth anniversary of Christopher Ironside with his " Royal Arms" design on a 50 Pence coin issued by the Royal Mint, UK