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Thursday, 26 January 2012

Did you know series (11) 5 (Five) Rupee Notes: Classification and Valuation.


Did you know series (11) 5 (Five) Rupee Notes: Classification and Valuation.


1)   The first five (5) rupee notes were issued in Independent India on 26.01.1950, (the day India became a Republic), under the signatures of Sir B.Rama Rau (RBI Governor 01.07.1949 – 14.01.1957). These notes were 127 x 73 mm in size and were green and brown predominantly, with a white water-mark window on the front and back, with a few alphabets and numerals in white and black. On the front, the serial number of the Note was given in the centre, below the denomination of the Note “Five Rupees “mentioned in words. 

The entire text on the note, including the denomination of the Note and the name of the Reserve Bank of India as well as the Governor’s promise to pay a sum of Rs. Five at any office of issue to the bearer were all mentioned in English only. On the right hand side was the Lion Capital of Emperor Asoka, which was now the symbol of sovereignty of the Government of India (without the words “Satyameva Jayate” (Truth always prevails).

On the back 8 Regional Languages were included in the centre with three antelopes with the RBI symbol on the left hand side enclosed in a panel and the denomination of the Note in another enclosed panel mentioned as “Rs.5”.

2)   Then, in July 1951, Hindi was introduced on the front side, but only in the denomination of the note which was mentioned incorrectly as “Paanch Rupiya” (Rupiya stands for a singular rupee whereas the correct word would have been “Rupiye” - plural). The serial number now shifted to the bottom right hand side on the front side.

On the back, the two panels depicting the RBI symbol and the Rs.5 denomination were interchanged in their placements. Also, the number of antelopes was raised from three to six (Three antelopes in front as in the earlier notes and three in the background were added now, comprising a herd)

The error “rupiya” (singular) was rectified to “rupiye” (plural) in April 1953. I have one of these notes in my collection with the plural version, images of which are placed below for reference:





The value of this Note in mint condition would be around Rs.7500/- upwards.

3)   During the tenure of HVR Iyengar (RBI Governor from 01.03.1957 to 28.02.1962) the shape of the water-mark windows were changed slightly both on the front and back, but the general design and language pattern was retained. The following two photos-images(contributed for this post by my sister Raka from her Notes collection),  are of a five rupee note issued under HVR Iyengar’s signatures with an “A” Inset:




The value of a five rupee Note in mint condition issued during Mr.Iyengar’s tenure like the one given above would be around Rs.1200/- or so.

4)   During the tenures of the next RBI Governors viz., P.C. Bhattacharya (RBI Governor: 01.03.1962 -30.06.1967), L.K.Jha (RBI Governor: 01.07.1957 – 03.05.1970), B.N.Adarkar (RBI Governor: 04.05.1970 – 15.06.1970) and S.Jagannathan (RBI Governor: 16.06.1970 – 19.05.1975), gradual changes in the design were introduced. On the front a large numeral “5” was introduced in the centre of the Note. Also the RBI Governor’s promise to pay a sum of Five Rupees to the bearer was introduced in Hindi along with the English version, with the English version of the Promise appearing on the right hand side. On the back, the number of Regional languages was increased from 8 to 13. 

On the back, the antelopes were replaced variously by Sambhars, Gazelles and Black Bucks at different points of time. In 1969, when India was celebrating the Birth Centenary of Mahatma Gandhi, his image appeared sitting in a cross-legged posture reading a book. The value of these notes in mint condition would be between Rs.500/- to say about Rs.1000/- depending upon the Collector’s requirement.

5)   Also, towards the end of RBI Governor S.Jagannathan’s tenure, a new design having a circular white watermark window both on the front and back, with the 13 Regional languages and the RBI monogram/logo moving to the front side was introduced. Also, the Hindi version of the RBI Governor’s promise to pay a sum of Five Rupees to the bearer of the Note appeared first on the left hand side of the Note, indicating the growing importance being accorded to the official language of India (English having been accorded the subsidiary/additional official language of India by the Policy makers). The name of the Issuing Authority “Bhartiya Reserve Bank” also appeared first on top of the Note in Hindi and then “Reserve Bank of India” in English below it.

With growing importance being given to Agriculture in the country, what with C.Subramanium having led the Green Revolution (Please refer my Post on his contribution to Indian Agriculture and the commemorative coin issued on him. (Reference link:http://exclusivecoins.blogspot.in/2011/07/32-c-subramanium-and-indian-green.html ), the back of the new design showed a rising Sun and a farmer ploughing his fields with a tractor having modern Agricultural equipment to facilitate him in growing more food crops.

This new design was continued during the tenures of N.C.Sengupta (RBI Governor: 19.05.1975 – 19.08.1975), K.R.Puri (RBI Governor: 20.08.1975 – 21.05.1977), M.Narasimhan (RBI Governor: 02.05.1977 – 30.11.1977), I.G.Patel (RBI Governor: 01.12.1977 – 15.09.1982), Manmohan Singh (RBI Governor: 16.09.1982 – 14.01.1985), Amitav Ghosh (RBI Governor: 15.01.1985 – 04.02.1985), R.N.Malhotra (RBI Governor: 04.02.1985 – 22.12.1990), S.Venkitaramanan (RBI Governor: 22.12.1990 – 21.12.1992), C.Rangarajan (RBI Governor: 22.12.1992 – 22.11.1997) and Bimal Jalan (RBI Governor : 22.11.1997 – 06.09.2003) Also, during the tenure of R.N Malhotra, the words  “Satyameva Jayate” (Truth Always Prevails) were added below the Lion Capital on the right hand side as part of the Government of India’s emblem. The value of these Notes would be about Rs.50/- to say about Rs.500/- for mint condition notes, depending upon a Collector’s requirement.



The above is a front image of a five rupee note issued under R.N. Malhotra’s signatures having an “F” Inset in its serial number. Notice that the Panel containing the Lion Capital has a dark background with no "Satyameva Jayate"(Truth always Prevails"). Also, “Bhartiya Reserve Bank” in Hindi appears above “Reserve Bank of India” in English on the centre-top of the Note. Also notice that the Hindi version of the RBI Governor’s promise to pay a sum of Five Rupees to the bearer of the Note appeared first on the left hand side of the Note, followed by the English version of the Promise to its right. Also, the Governor’s signatures are made both in Hindi and English, a convention which was introduced by the RBI during L.K Jha’s tenure.


The above is a front side image of a five rupee note issued under R.N.Malhotra’s signatures with an “A” Inset, having the words “Satyameva Jayate” (Truth Always Prevails) inscribed below the Lion Capital.
Also notice that the background colour in the Panel containing the Lion Capital has become a much lighter shade to enable easy recognition of the words “Satyameva Jayate”.


An image of a five rupee note issued during the tenure of S.Venkitaramanan with a “B” Inset, exhibiting all the other features of the above Note.


An image of a five rupee note issued under Bimal Jalan’s signatures with a Plain Inset also exhibiting all the other features of the two notes above. However, the note issued during Bimal Jalan’s tenure has fifteen Regional Languages on right hand side of the Lion Capital.


The design on the back of all the three Notes mentioned above showing a rising Sun and a farmer ploughing his fields with a tractor having modern Agricultural equipment to facilitate him in growing more food crops. None of these Notes has the year of issue mentioned at the back. The first time that the year of issue was mentioned on the back of five rupee notes, was only in 2009 during the tenure of D.Subbarao, the present RBI Governor.
 An image of a Rs.Five Banknote issued during Bimal Jalan's tenure ending in the  numerals "786", issued with a Plain inset, contributed for my collection by Krishna Tonpe.
         The Back of the above Banknote.

6)   A design change took place during Bimal Jalan’s tenure, wherein the image of Mahatma Gandhi appeared on the right hand side of the front of the Note. The fifteen Regional Languages moved to the back of the Note into a Languages Panel. The Lion Capital moved to the bottom left of the new design and The RBI logo shifted to the right hand side of the Mahatma Gandhi portrait. The circular watermark window on both the front and back was converted into a stylized D design. An interesting feature is that the “mesh design” behind Mahatma Gandhi’s Head is actually “RBI” written in very fine print which appears as a mesh design. On the back, the rising sun and farmer ploughing a Tractor in a field was retained, in continuing with the constant emphasis on growing more food crops/grains.

     

The above image exhibits the new design and has been issued during Bimal Jalan’s tenure with a “Plain Inset”. 


The back of the above Note exhibiting a mix of the old and new design features as explained above.


       
An image of a five rupee Note packet with its plastic band intact issued  during Bimal Jalan’s tenure with an “L” Inset. I happen to have this packet in my collection.   

                            
              The back of the above Note packet.
           
        
             The front of a note issued under Bimal Jalan’s signatures with an”R” Inset.

          These were the only three Inset styles under which five rupee notes were issued during Bimal Jalan’s tenure. The value of the notes issues during Bimal Jalan’s tenure would be about Rs.50/- or less. You may come across these Notes in Present day circulation for your collection.

7)   During the tenure of Y.V.Reddy (RBI Governor 06.09.2003 – 05.09.2008) five rupee notes were issued under his signatures with “Plain”, “L” and “R” Insets.  The value of these Notes would be around the same as the notes issued during Bimal Jalan’s tenure.


The above is an image of a five rupee Note issued with an "L"  inset during the tenure of Y.V.Reddy.

8)    


The above is an image of a five rupee note issued during the tenure of D. Subbarao, (the present RBI Governor: wef 06.09.2008) with an “E” Inset in 2009.


The back of the above note, showing the year of issue for the first time as 2009.


An image of a five Rupee Note issued under Dr.Subbarao’s signatures during 2009 with an “L” Inset. “L” Inset notes were also issued in 2010 under Dr. Subbarao’s signatures.


The back of the above Note showing the year of issue as 2009.



A five rupee note issued with a “Plain Inset” in 2010, under Dr. Subbarao’s signatures.


The back of the above Note showing the year of issue as 2010.

 The value of these Notes in mint condition issued under Dr. Subbarao’s tenure would be below Rs.25/- to face value.

Posted on 23.01.2014:

Reserve Bank of India has now decided to withdraw all currency notes issued prior to 2005, without specifically mentioning that these Banknotes will cease to be legal tender. From April 2014 all Banks will accept and exchange pre-2005 Banknotes. These Banknotes are easily identified by the absence of the year of printing on the Back of the Note. RBI estimates that the maximum number of fake currency Banknotes are from the period prior to 2005. From 01.07.2014, to exchange more than 10 pieces of Rs.500/- and Rs.1000/- banknotes, non-customers will have to furnish identity and address proof to the Bank Branch.  However, it is expected that later on RBI will issue a communication advising users the final date upto which Banknotes prior to 2005 will be accepted by the Bank. 


Therefore, please start examining the year of issue"at the back of the currency Notes passing through your hands, so as not to face the inconvenience of going to a Bank Branch for returning the currency issued prior to 2005.


While this is a welcome step, RBI needs to have a policy in place to take the remaining counterfeit Banknotes issued after 2005, like changing/revamping the Front and Back designs, adding more effective security features etc. so as not to put users at risk of accepting counterfeit currency Banknotes.


 Posted on 03.03.2014:   

   The Reserve Bank of India has extended the date for exchanging the pre-2005 banknotes to January 01, 2015. It has also advised banks to facilitate the exchange of these notes for full value and without causing any inconvenience whatsoever to the public.
   RBI has further clarified that the public can continue to freely use these notes for any transaction and can unhesitatingly receive these notes in payment, as all such notes continue to remain legal tender till that date.

Posted on 31.12.14: 

 The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has extended the deadline for turning in pre-2005 Banknotes to 30.06.2015. While these Banknotes would be treated as legal tender upto this period, but RBI would destroy them as and when they come into Bank branches. 

RBI has sought the general public’s cooperation and urged them to deposit the old design Banknotes in their Bank accounts or exchange them at a bank branch convenient to them. 

RBI has further mentioned that the Banknotes can be exchanged for their full value till this date. Check out all your Banknotes and deposit all such Banknotes (i.e. without the year of issue printed at the back) at convenient Bank branches before the scheduled date.


Posted on 26.06.2015:

The Reserve Bank of India has extended the date for the public to exchange their pre-2005 banknotes till December 31, 2015. It had, in December 2014, set the last date for public to exchange these notes as June 30, 2015.

Soliciting cooperation from members of public in withdrawing these banknotes from circulation, the Reserve Bank of India has urged them to deposit the old design notes in their bank accounts or exchange them at a bank branch convenient to them. 

The Reserve Bank has further stated that the notes can be exchanged for their full value. It has also clarified that all such notes continue to remain legal tender.
Posted on 06.02.2016:

Ayesha and Zaheer Hasan have sent me images of the following interesting error Banknote in the denomination of Rupees Five:
The above is an image of two Banknotes - Serial Nos. 32V 473229 and 32V 473222 from the same Series/packet. On the front both Banknotes exhibit regular/normal features
 Now take a look at the above image of the Backs of the two Banknotes. The Banknote with the Serial No. 32V 473229 is entirely blank, which is reminiscent of the Uniface Banknotes introduced during the reign of Queen Victoria in 1861 and printing of which continued till 1925 i.e. till the reign of George V, while the Banknote with the Serial No. 32V 473222 exhibits regular/normal features.
  Posted on 09.11.2016:

Fighting Black Money in India:

After the recently closed Black Money Voluntary Disclosure Scheme, which closed on end September 2016, the Government of India has brought in a major step on 08.11.2016 in its war against corruption, terrorism and black money.

Before the present Government took over the reins of Government about two years ago, India ranked around 100 in global rankings of corruption. Presently, it ranks 76th.

Black Money estimated at about Rs.1.25 lakh crores has been brought back to India according to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Nevertheless, this is not an exemplary position to be in, as such, the Government has taken some drastic measures:

The Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in a televised address to the nation on 08.11.2016 evening announced the demonetisation of the presently circulating higher denominations of currency viz. Rs.500/- and Rs.1000/- with effect from the coming midnight i.e. midnight of 08.11.2016. He stated that the Banknotes of these denominations will “just be worthless pieces of paper”. The Banknotes of all the lower denominations of Rs.100/-, Rs.50/-, Rs.20/-, Rs.10/-, Rs.5/-, Rs.2/- and Re 1/- and all coins will continue to be accepted as legal tender. In addition, new Banknotes in the denominations of Rs.2000/- and Rs.500/- will be introduced.

Also, there will be no change in any other form of currency exchange i.e. cheques, Demand Drafts, credit card or debit card payments.

This has been necessitated as the Government has been fighting the menace of black money and corruption over the past two years when it was voted to power.

To facilitate the smooth transition to the new money regime, Banks will be closed on 09.11.2016.

Presently, Rs.500/- and Rs.1000/- Banknotes which have been demonetised account for 86.4 % of the total value of Banknotes which were in circulation as of 31.03.2016.

Some instances, where the Rs.1000/- and Rs.500/- old Banknotes can still be used:

Existing Rs.500/-  and Rs.1000/- Banknotes will be accepted till 11.11.2016 at Government hospitals, pharmacies in Government hospitals (with prescriptions), Railway counters, Government buses, Airline counters, petrol pumps, Cooperative stores run by Government, milk booths of State agencies, crematoria and burial grounds.

The result of this announcement:

I saw huge crowds of four wheelers and two wheelers at petrol pumps which stayed open, but several petrol pumps closed before time.

Two Shopping Malls in the vicinity of my residence remained open till midnight and saw unprecedented rush of shoppers, as Banknotes of Rs.1000/- and Rs.500/- denominations remained legal tender till midnight of 08.11.2016.

Several persons stood patiently in serpentine queues to withdraw small denomination Rs.100/- Banknotes to meet their expenses over the next few days, as a result, several ATMs went out of cash.

What else?

On 9th and 10th November 2016, ATMs will not work, as smaller denomination banknotes will be arranged for by the ATM Management Groups/Banks.

All Banks will remain closed on 09.11.2016.

From 10.11.2016 to 31.12.2016, customers can deposit Banknotes of Rs.500/- and Rs.1000/- in any Bank or Post Office. However, there is a condition – the depositor will have to show a proof of identity. One can deposit any amount into one’s own account, but if KYC documents have not been submitted, the limit is Rs.50,000/-

This condition will be relaxed somewhat, as after 31.12.2016, one can still deposit old Banknotes with valid ID proof at specified offices of RBI, to be intimated later till 31.03.2017.

No restrictions on payments by cheques, DD, debit/credit cards & Electronic Fund Transfer (EFTs) has been made.

From 10.11.2016, Banks and Post Offices will operate for extended hours to facilitate the unprecedented rush of deposit of the cash  into deposit accounts. 
The exchange facility is available at all Issue Offices of RBI and branches of commercial banks/RRBS/UCBs/State Co-op banks or at any Head Post Office or Sub-Post Office.


Depositors can withdraw up to Rs.2,000/- per day per card from ATMs till November 18 and Rs.4,000/- per day per card after this date.

The ATMs will resume functioning from November 11, 2016 upon their recalibration to dispense bank notes of the denominations of Rs.50/-, Rs.100/- Rs.500/- and Rs.2,000/-
Further, so as to ensure customer convenience, banks are also advised to provide all cash withdrawal transactions at their ATMs free of cost to their customers till 30 Dec 2016. It has also been decided that banks may fix a limit of Rs 2000/- per day per card withdrawal limit at ATMs, for all their customers, till November 18, 2016.  For deposits being made at Banks and other establishments, please note, that one will get upto ₹4000 per person in cash irrespective of the size of tender and anything over and above that will be receivable by way of credit to bank account.

Thereafter, one can withdraw up to Rs.10,000/- per day and Rs.20,000/- per week either through withdrawal slips, cheques or through ATMs from Banks till 24.11.2016. After this date, the limit will be raised.

Depositors can withdraw up to Rs.2,000/- per day per card from ATMs till November 18 and Rs.4,000/- per day per card after this date.

Freshly designed Banknotes of Rs.500/- and Rs.2000/- with chips in them will be introduced on Thursday, i.e. 10.11.2016.

One can contact the following RBI & Government helpline numbers for any query – 022-22602201 and 022-22602944 (RBI) and Ministry of Finance: 011-23093230.

Property prices could drop substantially in the secondary market, as there is an estimated 60:40 (Legal-to-Black money ratio) in operation as at present.

This step is also aimed at stamping out the menace of corruption and terror funding, as terrorists from across the border have been using fake currency notes.

A word of caution:

One can also deposit the demonetised currency in someone else’s account with written authorisation and one’s ID proof.

The Government/RBI has cautioned citizens against exchanging other person’s unaccounted cash at Banks/Post Offices. Security cameras will monitor transactions at branches and the exchange will be recorded.

Introduction of the new denominations of Rs.2000/- and R.500/-:

Reserve Bank of India has yet to decide the limit for individuals for possession of Banknotes of higher value i.e. Rs.2000/- and Rs.500/- which will be put into circulation from 10.11.2016.
 The Front of the new Rs.2000/- Banknote which is now going to be in circulation wef 10.11.2016    
The Back of the new Rs.2000/- Banknote shows the "Mangalayan" (which is the Mars Orbiter)     
The salient features of the new Rs.2000/- Banknotes are:

The Series will be called the Mahatma Gandhi (New) Series.

The Banknotes will bear the signatures of Dr. Urjit R. Patel, RBI Governor.

The year of printing will start from 2016 which will be printed on the Back of the Banknote.
The new denomination has the motif of the "Mangalayan" on the Back, which is India's first venture in inter-planetary space.
The base colour of the Banknote is magenta .
The Banknote has other designs, geometric patterns aligning with the overall colour scheme, both on the Front and Back. 

Other important features of the Banknote:

On the Front: See through Register with denominational numeral 2000

Latent image with denominational numeral 2000

Denominational numeral 2000 in Devnagri

Portrait of Mahatma Gandhi at the centre

Micro letters “RBI” and “2000” on the left side of the Banknote

Windowed security thread with inscriptions “Bharat” (in Hindi), RBI and 2000 on Banknotes with colour shift. Colour of the thread changes from green to blue when the Banknote is tilted

Guarantee Clause, RBI Governor’s signature with Promise Clause and RBI emblem towards the right

Denominational numeral with Rupee symbol “R 2000” in colour changing ink (green to blue) on bottom right, Ashoka Pillar emblem on the right.

Watermarks: Mahatma Gandhi portrait and electrotype (2000).

Number panel with numerals growing from small to big on the top left side and bottom right side

For visually impaired:

Intaglio or raised printing of Mahatma Gandhi portrait, Ashoka Pillar emblem, Bleed lines and identity marks.

Horizontal rectangle with “R2000” in raised print on the right.

Seven angular bleed lines on the left and right side in raised print

Other features:

Year of printing on the Banknote on the left

Swachh Bharat” logo with slogan

Language Panel towards the centre

Motif of Mangalyaan

Denominational numeral “2000” in Devnagri

Size/Dimensions of the Banknote: 166 mm x 66 mm


The Front of the new Rs.500/- Banknote which is now going to be in circulation wef 10.11.2016   
The Back of the new Rs.500/- Banknote shows the Red Fort in New Delhi
 The salient features of the new Rs.500/- Banknotes are:

The Series will be called the Mahatma Gandhi (New) Series.

The Banknotes will bear the signatures of Dr. Urjit R. Patel, RBI Governor.

The year of printing will start from 2016 which will be printed on the Back of the Banknote.
The new Banknote is different from the present series in colour, size, theme, location of security features and design elements.
The colour of the Banknote is stone-grey.
The Banknote has a pre-dominant new theme - Indian heritage site - Red Fort.
On the Front: See through Register with denominational numeral 500

Latent image with denominational numeral 500

Denominational numeral 500 in "Devnagri"

 Portrait of Mahatma Gandhi at the centre

Micro letters “RBI” and “500” on the left side of the Banknote

Windowed security thread with inscriptions “Bharat” (in Hindi), RBI and 500 on Banknotes with colour shift. Colour of the thread changes from green to blue when the Banknote is tilted

Guarantee Clause, RBI Governor’s signature with Promise Clause and RBI emblem towards the right

Denominational numeral with Rupee symbol “R 500” in colour changing ink (green to blue) on bottom right, Ashoka Pillar emblem on the right.

Watermarks: Mahatma Gandhi portrait and electrotype (500).

Number panel with numerals growing from small to big on the top left side and bottom right side

For visually impaired:

Intaglio or raised printing of Mahatma Gandhi portrait, Ashoka Pillar emblem, Bleed lines and identity marks.

Horizontal rectangle with “R500” in raised print on the right.

Five angular bleed lines on the left and right side in raised print

On the Back:

Year of printing on the Banknote on the left

Swachh Bharat” logo with slogan

Language Panel towards the centre

Motif of Red Fort, New Delhi

Denominational numeral500” in Devnagri

Size/Dimensions of the Banknote: 150 mm x 63 mm  


  A cartoonist's impression of how the demonetised Banknotes can be used - by eating snacks on them.
This is a handy chart showing the various dates and options available to the customers/depositors  
This form is to be filled in , in case the demonetised currency is being deposited in a non-home Branch/Post Office.










 Links to other posts on Indian Currency denominations on this blog:

1) Introduction of the new Rs.2000/- denomination in Indian Currency circulation wef 10.11.2016 

2) Classification and Valuation of Rs.1000/- denomination Banknotes 

 3) Classification and Valuation of Rs.500/- Banknotes

  4)Classification and Valuation of Rs.100/- Notes

5) Classification and Valuation of Rs.50/- Notes 

6) Classification and Valuation of Rs.20/- Notes 

7) Classification and Valuation of Rs.10/- Notes 

8) Classification and Valuation of Rs.5/- Notes 

9) Evolution and Valuation of one Rupee Banknotes in India

10) Did-you-know-series-1: Assists for identification of Currency Notes by visually challenged users 

11) Did-you-know-series-2-what-is-design-or focus of the picture at the back of circulating Currency Notes in India

12) Are you carrying a Fake Rs.500/- Banknote in your purse/wallet?: A comprehensive study 

13) Introduction of a Rs.200/- Banknote wef 25.08.2017: Reasons for introduction, Necessity & convenience to Users


7 comments:

  1. i have 5rs note with 4 and 6 deers how much value can i get from them plzz tell...6deer with hvr governors signature n 4 deer with jagannathann and l k jha sign on it..

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Aman' I have today sent a reply to your email address given under the Rs.100/- post. I hope you find it useful.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have 5 rupees note which isonly one sided print,other side is blank.how much I can expect. 9811863188

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Raman,
      You could check up the quotes on eBay and other such websites and arrive at an assessment of the value of your note. the thumb rule is that Banknotes in mint condition command more value than used/worn out notes.

      Delete
  4. sir first Indian note which is issue after independence is cd deshmukh sign without king gorge potrate after that sir b rama rao governor note of 5 rupees not is issue..plz update it

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Mohammad. I will study your suggestion, as and when I get some spare time.

      Delete
  5. Hi,
    I have a 5 rupee note with Dr.Subbarao sign and Letter 'L' inset on it.. May I know how much it worth ? 26c

    please reply me details on my email kiran120023@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete