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Sunday, 20 May 2012

Did you know series (12): One Pound coins: The contribution of the Great British one-pound coins in keeping alive the historical legends/emblems/heritage of the United kingdom/British Isles: (1983 – Present day).


Did you know series (12): One Pound coins:
The contribution of the Great British one-pound coins in keeping alive the historical legends/emblems/heritage of the United kingdom/British Isles:
(1983 – Present day).

 I am giving below the stories/legends/historical significance of the designs on the various one pound circulating /uncirculated coins from the 1983 to present day. Some of these coins have been contributed for my coin collection by my friends: Ajit (3 coins), Dennis (2 image scans) and Jayant (3 coins). 

I had collected several one pound coins during my Christmas/New Year vacations spent with Ajit in London in December 2006 (during which my cousin who had taken us to visit the Greenwich International time-line and the famous ship the Cutty Sark, collected all my one pound coins and dropped them in the car parking meter before realising that one could park vehicles for 15 minutes only at that spot. So, the coins were lost and we could not park the car at that spot.

The first time that a one pound coin (nicknamed the “Round Pound”) was issued by the Royal Mint on 21st April 1983, replacing the one Pound currency Note which ceased to be issued in 1984 and was completely withdrawn from circulation on 11th March 1988. Nevertheless one pound notes are still issued in Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man as well as the Royal Bank of Scotland.

An interesting feature of the one pound coin issues is that the designs on the reverse of the coins are different for every year from 1983 to 2008 and by rotation, show an emblem/legend/historical heritage representing the U.K., England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Scotland.


On the obverse is placed a bust/portrait of a young Queen Elizabeth II facing right wearing a coronet. On the left periphery is the inscription “D.G.REG.F.D.1983” (By the grace of God Queen, Defender of the Faith). The year of issue is 1983. On the right periphery is mentioned “Elizabeth II”. This design was made by Arnold Machin. Notice that the obverse side designer’s initials do not figure below the Queen’s portrait, as in the later one pound coins issued from 1998 onwards.

The specifications of this and all other circulating one Pound coins is Nickel-brass alloy (Copper 70%, Zinc 24.5% and Nickel 5.5%. Its diameter is 22.50mm and it has a weight of 9.50 gms. The value of the metal composition placed in each GBP 1 coin is 4.18 UK pennies; hence it is very cost effective for the Royal Mint to issue these coins.

 
The reverse was designed by Eric Sewell and shows the Ornamental Royal Arms. 

This design was repeated in 1993, 1998, 1999, 2003 and then again in 2008. The coins issued in 1998 and 1999 were commemorative coins only and not issued as circulating coins.

DECUS ET TUTAMEN (meaning “An Ornament and a Safeguard”):  is the Latin edge inscription on the coin with “decus” meaning shield, virtue, honour/glory and “tutamen” meaning defence or protection”). 

The origin of this phrase seems to be from Virgil’s poem “The Aeneid, Book V L.262”, where the poet refers to a piece of armour, (a breast – plate interwoven with gold, awarded as a prize to Mnestheus, of the House of Asaracus, the hero of Memmii, who is Aeneas’s senior-most lieutenant and is the runners-up in the boat-race during the funeral games of Anchises), as “viro decus et tutamen in armis”.

In British coinage, this inscription refers to as a safeguard against “clipping of precious metal” or “coin debasement” (by decreasing the amount of precious metal in a coin, while, still continuing to circulate it at face value, leaving the debaser with a profit) minted from 1774 onwards and this edge inscription has been carried forward to these base metal coins being minted in the designated years.

 The phrase “decus et tutamen” is, also, the motto of a British Cavalry Regiment, presently an Artillery Regiment called the Essex Yeomanry raised in 1794.

 Also seen on the edge of this coin as well as all other issues from the Royal Mint since 1968, is a small crosslet which is the mint mark of Llantrisant  in South Wales where the Royal Mint is now based.( All my commemorative coins booked from the Royal Mint have been sent to me from Llantrisant).


The obverse of the one-pound coin issued in 1984 has the same portrait of Queen Elizabeth II which appeared on the 1983 issue designed by Arnold Machin and has the same inscriptions on its periphery.



The reverse of this coin has been depicts a Scottish emblem/legend and shows a Thistle sprig in a coronet, representing Scotland. 

The edge inscription on this coin is “NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT” which translates from Latin into English as “No one attacks me with impunity” or “ No one can harm me unpunished” or in Scottish as “Wha daur meddle wi’me?”. In Scottish Gaelic it is “Cha togar m’fhearg gun dioladh”.

The legend goes thus: The ancient land of Scotland was under attack by the sea – faring Norwegian Vikings. As per fighting traditions, the battles continued during the day and cease-fire was observed at sun-down to tend to the wounded and carry the dead for their last rites, only to be resumed at sun-rise the next day. This practice was observed in the great Mahabharata War in Indian tradition and the Trojan War in Greek tradition et al. The wily Viking Generals thought that the best time to attack the Scottish defences was at night. Unfortunately for the Vikings, one of their soldiers stepped on a prickly thistle, alerting the Scottish defences and the Viking attack was repulsed.

Thus, the thistle having saved the day for the Scots, has been given the honour of being the Floral Emblem of Scotland and “me” in the phrase originally referred to the Thistle itself, but today it, inter alia, refers to three Scottish/British Regiments, which have adopted it viz. Royal Scots, Royal Scots Greys, Royal Highland Fusiliers, the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment of the Canadian Forces – a reserve infantry regiment), the Royal Company of Archers, Cape town Highlanders Regiment – a reserve mechanised infantry unit in South Africa etc.

During the reign of Charles II, the motto appeared on a scroll beneath the shield and overlying the compartment and was added to the Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland and from 1707 onwards appears on the Scottish version of the Arms of the British Sovereigns, including in the present Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom used in Scotland. The motto appears in conjunction with the collar of the “Order of the Thistle” placed around the shield.
The motto also finds a mention in Edgar Allan Poe’s story “The Cask of Amontillado” and in a ballad titled “Little Jock Elliot”. It can also be seen on 1778 $20 bills issued from Georgia.

This design was engraved on the 1984 and 1989 Scottish editions of the British one-pound coin.

The motto, on the other hand, has been shown as an edge inscription on the 1984 and 1994 Scottish editions of the British one pound coins.



The obverse of this 1985 Welsh edition of the one pound coin has a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II wearing a crown, designed by Raphael Maklouf. This design was repeated in 1997. The inscriptions on the periphery of this coin are essentially the same as the earlier ones. However, notice, that, unlike, in the earlier two coins issued in 1983 and 1984, the Queen’s name “Elizabeth II” has moved to the left hand side of the coin and the words “D.G. Reg. F.D. 1985” have moved to the right hand side of the coin. The edge inscription is “PLEIDIOL WYF I’M GWLAD” (meaning – True am I to my country) and is taken from the refrain of “Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau” (English Translation – “Old Land of my Fathers” - the Welsh National Anthem).



The reverse of this coin shows a Leek in a coronet, representing Wales. The Leek is one of the National emblems of Wales, and is worn along with the Daffodil (which in Welsh is also known as “Peter’s Leek) on St. David’s Day.

Legend has it that King Cadwaladr of Gwynedd told his troops to wear Leeks on their helmets in a battle against the Saxons to identify themselves to their comrades, as the battle took place in a Leek field.
The Leek also finds a mention in Shakespeare’s Henry V, where Henry wears a Leek, as he is shown as being of  Welsh origins and  in keeping with Welsh’ ancient traditions.

The Leek is also placed on a cap badge of the Welsh Guards, a Regiment of the Household Division of the British army.

The Leek in a coronet design was carried in both the 1985 and 1990 Welsh editions of the one pound coin.



The next coin in my collection was issued in 1991 and is a repeat of the Irish (Northern Ireland) edition of the one pound coin issued in 1986. The obverse design is the same as was carried in the coin shown above. 

The edge inscription is again “DECUS ET TUTAMEN” (an Ornament and a Safeguard), as explained under the 1983 one pound coin discussed above.



The reverse shows “Flax” placed in a coronet, representing Northern Ireland. Flax is among the oldest fibres crops in the World and was used to manufacture cloth since the times of the ancient Egyptians. Later it was cultivated in Northern Europe since Neolithic times.

Flax is the emblem of Northern Ireland and is used by the Northern Ireland Assembly and is, also found on the badge of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom and on various other logos.


The next coin was issued in 1987 and 1992, and is from the England edition of the one-pound coin.

  The obverse design is the same as was carried in the coin shown above. The edge inscription is again “DECUS ET TUTAMEN” (an Ornament and a Safeguard), as explained under the 1983 one pound coin discussed above.
  

 The reverse shows an Oak tree in a coronet, representing England. The Oak tree is a symbol of England, representing strength and endurance. 

The term Royal Oak refers to the escape of King Charles II from the hands of the Parliamentarians after his father’s execution, because he hid in an oak tree to avoid detection before safely reaching exile.




This coin was issued in 1994 and is the Scottish edition of the one pound coin. The obverse design is the same as was carried in the coins shown immediately above. The edge inscription on this coin is “NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT”, explained in detail above in this post.



The reverse shows a Lion Rampant within a double tressure flory counter flory representing Scotland. This image represents the Royal Standard of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: “Bratach rioghail na h-Alba” and in Scots: “Royal Banner o Scotland”) also known as the “Banner of the King of the Scots” or “the Lion Rampant of Scotland”.



Royal Standard of Scotland

 It is also the Scottish Royal Banner of Arms. This Royal Banner was adopted as the Royal emblem in 1222, during the reign of Alexander II. It is different from the Scottish National flag “the Saltire”, and is used only by officials / royal residences in Scotland as prescribed by an Act of the Scottish Parliament.
Since 1603, the Lion Rampant of Scotland has been included in both the Royal Arms and Royal banners of Scottish and British monarchs to symbolise Scotland. The Royal standard of Scotland is one of the most popular symbols of Scotland. The design of the banner which has been represented here is traditionally “Red (Gules) Lion Rampant, with blue (Azure) claws and tongue, within a red double border having a motif of alternating heraldic lilies, on a yellow (Or) field.





The obverse of two one–pound coins representing the Welsh editions issued in 1995 and 2000. Notice that the effigy of Queen Elizabeth II is different in both these coins

The first coin shows her portrait as was being engraved in the earlier coins shown above. 

However, since 1998, a new design created by Ian Rank – Broadley is seen on the obverse of all coins issued by the Royal Mint, hence the second coin shows a different image of the Queen. Also, notice the initials of the obverse designer “IRB” below the bust of the Queen which have appeared for the first time since 1998 on the one pound coins. 

The edge inscription on this coin is “PLEIDIOL WYF I’M GWLAD” (meaning True am I to my country).



The reverse shows the Welsh Dragon Passant representing Wales. In Welsh: “Y Ddraig Goch” or “the red dragon”) which appears on the National Flag of Wales. The flag is also called “Y Ddraig Goch”. 


Flag of Wales.

The oldest mention of this flag is found in the “Historia Brittonum (History of Britain) written in the ninth century A.D. and is said to have been the battle standard of King Arthur (also referred to as Arthur Pendragon named after his father “Uther Pendragon” or “Chief Dragon”) and other Celtic leaders.

 The red dragon also finds a mention in the “Mabinogion” story of “Lludd and LLefelys”, where the Red Dragon fights with the invading white dragon, till King LLudd takes the help of his brother Llefelys who fills a deep pit with mead which the dragons drink and go to sleep, thus saving the people from collateral damage from their fierce fight and are imprisoned in “Dinas Emrys” in Snowdonia.

 It is further mentioned that centuries later King Vortigen is unsuccessful in building walls for a castle over the land where the two dragons sleep , till a boy ( said to have been Merlin, the wisest wizard who ever lived gets Vortigen to free the dragons who continue their fight till the white dragon is defeated. The Red dragon symbolises the Welsh people and the white dragon represents the Saxons who could not subdue the Welsh.

Henry VII showed the red dragon of “Cadwaladr ap Cadwallon” on his banner which was augmented in 1953.
 The augmented badge depicts: “Within a circular riband Argent fimbriated Or bearing the motto “Y DDRAIG GOCH DDYRY CYCHWYN” (meaning – the Red dragon inspires action), in letters Vert, and ensigned with a representation of the Crown proper, an escutcheon per fesse argent and Vert and thereon the Dragon passant”.

Picture of red dragon Royal badge

This badge is part of the Arms of the Welsh capital city of Cardiff and is also found on a flag of Wales, which was replaced by the current flag of Wales.
A badge used by the Prince of Wales since 1901 also shows a red dragon which has now been replaced since 2008 by another badge.



The obverse sides of the two one pound issues in 1996 and 2001 representing the Northern Ireland  editions have the effigy of Queen Elizabeth II engraved  differently in both these coins. The first coin issued in 1996 shows her portrait as was being engraved in the pound coins prior to 1998. 
However, since 1998, a new design created by Ian Rank – Broadley is seen on the obverse of all coins issued by the Royal Mint, hence the second coin(given above) shows a different image of the Queen as it has been issued in 2001.
The edge inscription on this coin is “DECUS ET TUTAMEN”(An ornament and a safeguard).



The reverse shows:

i)                     a Celtic Cross (in Irish: cross Cheilteach, in Welsh: croes Geltaidd, in Cornish: krows Geltek ). Below is an image of a traditional Celtic cross:

ii)                    a Broighter collar (The Broighter Gold is a treasure of gold artefacts from the Iron Age  discovered in 1896 in Northern Ireland and inter alia,  includes a gold boat, a gold torc/collar and bowl. A design from this important gold find has been included on this one pound coin design. The Treasure/hoard is kept in the National Museum of Ireland at Dublin after a long drawn court battle regarding the ownership of the artefacts. Some items in this find are described as the finest examples of Irish La Tene gold-work. Below is an image of the Broighter collar together with a bowl found in the treasure/hoard:

iii)                 A pimpernel in the centre (a flowering plant from the genus Anagallis; family Myrsinaceae). 
(I use this coin while doing a Tarot Card reading using the Celtic Cross deck, because it represents Celtic traditions through the Ages. Please refer my post on the link given at the bottom of this post).



The next coin in my collection was issued in 1997 and 2002 from the England edition of the one pound coins

The obverse of this coin shows this effigy of Queen Elizabeth II for the last time, as it was replaced in 1998 by another design. 

The edge inscription is “DECUS ET TUTAMEN” (meaning – An Ornament and a Safeguard).



Reverse of the above coin showing three lions passant representing England. This coin features the three Lions which are on the Royal Arms of England. The Arms showing three Lions was originally adopted by Richard the Lion Heart in 1198. It is blazoned as “gules, three lions passant guardant Or” and is one of the most prominent symbols of England and is similar to the traditional Arms of Normandy.

Image of the Royal Banner of England
  
The Royal banner of England carries an image of three Lions and the motto “DIEU ET MON DROIT” (meaning God and my right). 

 
Forth Bridge, Scotland:
This coin was issued in 2004 and has the Queen’s bust designed by Ian Rank-Broadley and engraved on all British coins since 1998. This coin is from the Scotland edition of British one Pound coins.
The edge inscription on this coin is two overlapping lines, one curved and one angular.
 

 The reverse of this coin shows the Forth Railway Bridge, encircled by a Railway Line. The Forth Bridge is a cantilever Railway Bridge over the Firth of Forth, in the East of Scotland. Also referred to as the Forth Railway Bridge, it has been in use since 4th March 1890. The Bridge connects Edinburgh (Capital of Scotland) with Fife and is a major Rail – link between the North – East and South – East of the country. It is one of the most famous internationally recognised Scottish landmarks and is in line to get the UNESCO World Heritage site status. The Forth Bridge till 1917 was the longest single cantilever bridge span in the world. It currently is the second largest such Bridge in the World after the Quebec Bridge. 

In addition, the 2007 series of Bank – notes issued by the Bank of Scotland in their Prominent Scottish Bridges series, have featured this Bridge on the 20 Pound note.





The next coin in my collection is from the Welsh edition and was issued in 2005

The obverse of this coin shows the effigy of Queen Elizabeth II which has been engraved on all British coins since 1998. Notice the initials of the designer, below the queen’s bust “IRB” (for Ian Rank-Broadley).

The edge inscription shows two overlapping lines, one curved and one angular.




The reverse of this coin shows the Menai Suspension Bridge (Welsh: Pont Grog y Borth) inside a border of railings and stanchions/encircled by a truss. The reverse has been designed by Edwina Ellis.

This suspension bridge is found between the island of Anglesey and the mainland of Wales. Designed by Thomas Telford and commissioned in 1826, it is the first modern suspension bridge in the World. On 28th February 2005, the bridge was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.



This coin in my collection is from the Northern Ireland edition and was issued in 2006. The obverse of this coin shows the effigy of Queen Elizabeth II which has been engraved on all British coins since 1998. 

Notice the initials of the designer, below the queen’s bust “IRB” (for Ian Rank-Broadley).

The edge inscription shows two overlapping lines, one curved and one angular.



The reverse shows the MacNeill’s Egyptian Arch at Newry – in Irish “Airse Eigipteach Mac Neill”. It is found on the Belfast – Dublin Railway Line in Northern Ireland and the Arch was constructed in 1851 by Sir John Macneill. The rail bridge passes over the Newry – Camlough Road in the county Armagh. Interestingly, the bridge is so named because of its resemblance to an Egyptian Pharoah’s head – piece. This design too has been made by Edwina Ellis.

Millennium Bridge, Newcastle/Gateshead (England):

This coin was issued in 2007 and has the Queen’s bust designed by Ian Rank-Broadley and engraved on all British coins since 1998.
This coin is from the England edition of British one Pound coins.
The edge inscription on this coin is two overlapping lines, one curved and one angular.


 The reverse of the coin shows the Millennium Bridge encircled by a truss. Designed by Wilkinson Eyre Architects and engineered by Gifford, it is one of the most distinguished Bridges on the river Tyne. It is a Pedestrian and Cyclist Tilt Bridge between Gateshead’s Quays arts quarter on the South Bank and the Quayside of Newcastle upon Tyne on the North Bank. The Bridge has been in use since 7th May 2002. An interesting feature of this Bridge is that it has Hydraulic Rams which rotate the Bridge back on large bearings to allow small ships and crafts to pass underneath. The Bridge is sometimes referred to as the “Blinking Eye Bridge” or the Winking Eye Bridge” because of its appearance during this rotation.
The Gateshead Millennium Bridge has also featured on a postage stamp.




The obverse shows a bust of Queen Elizabeth II in the style of the design approved in 1998 made by Ian Rank Broadley with the inscription on the periphery and the year of issue 2012. The edge inscription on this coin is “DECUS ET TUTAMEN”(An ornament and a safeguard).(For a detailed reference, please refer my post “65) The Royal Coat of arms of the United Kingdom: Great British 2012 Coin set (Uncirculated) issued by Royal Mint, U.K.” - on the link given at the bottom of this post).



The design  carried on the reverse of this coin is the four quarterings of the Royal shield from the Royal Arms and is the standard design on one pound coins issued from 2008 onwards. (For a detailed reference, please refer my post “65) The Royal Coat of arms of the United Kingdom: Great British 2012 Coin set (Uncirculated) issued by Royal Mint, U.K.” - on the link given at the end of this post).  

 There are, however the following four exceptions, where four coins were issued commemorating the Capital cities of the United Kingdom:

i) The Coat of Arms of the City of London (one pound commemorative coin  issued in 2010):

The Obverse of this coin has the Queen’s bust designed by Ian Rank-Broadley together with the inscription “ELIZABETH II D.G.REG.F.D. 2010”. The edge inscription on this coin is “DOMINE DIRIGE NOS (LORD GUIDE US), which is the motto of the City of London in Latin.

 

On the reverse is the circular coat of Arms of the City of London, with the words “LONDON” on the top and the denomination of the coin “ONE” and “POUND” on either side of the Shield. The Coat of Arms of the three other capital cities being commemorated with similar one-pound coin issues are placed in small engraving on the lower side of the coin, with the Arms of Cardiff, Belfast and Edinburgh being shown from left to right.

ii)  The Coat of Arms of the City of Belfast (one pound commemorative coin issued in 2010):
The obverse of this coin is similar to the above coin. The edge inscription on this coin is “PRO TANTO QUID RETRIBUAMUS” (FOR SO MUCH, WHAT SHALL WE GIVE IN RETURN), which is the motto of the City of Belfast in Latin.

 
On the reverse is the circular Coat of Arms of Belfast, with the words “BELFAST” on the top and the denomination of the coin “ONE” and “POUND” on either side of the Shield. The Coat of Arms of the three other capital cities being commemorated with similar one-pound coin issues are placed in small engraving on the lower side of the coin, with the Arms of Edinburgh, London and Cardiff being shown from left to right.


iii) The Coat of Arms of the city of Cardiff ( one pound commemorative coin issued in 2011):


The obverse of this coin is similar to the above coin. The edge Inscription is “Y DDRAIG GOCH DDYRY CYCHWYN” (THE RED DRAGON SHALL LEAD), which is the motto of the City of Cardiff in Latin.

 
On the reverse is the circular Coat of Arms of Cardiff, with the words “CARDIFF” on the top and the denomination of the coin “ONE” and “POUND” on either side of the Shield. The Coat of Arms of the three other capital cities being commemorated with similar one-pound coin issues are placed in small engraving on the lower side of the coin, with the Arms of Belfast, Edinburgh and London  being shown from left to right.

iv)  The Coat of Arms of the city of Edinburgh 
(one pound commemorative coin issued in 2011):


 
The obverse of this coin is similar to the above coin. The edge Inscription is “NISI DOMINUS FRUSTRA” (It is vain without the Lord), which is the motto of the City of Edinburgh in Latin.

 
 On the reverse is the circular Coat of Arms of Edinburgh, with the words “EDINBURGH” on the top and the denomination of the coin “ONE” and “POUND” on either side of the Shield. The Coat of Arms of the three other capital cities being commemorated with similar one-pound coin issues are placed in small engraving on the lower side of the coin, with the Arms of London, Cardiff and Belfast and Cardiff being shown from left to right. 

Posted on 03.12.12: 




  For 2013, the Royal Mint has brought out two new  one pound coins whose reverse has been designed by Timothy Noad. The reverse of  the coin representing England features an oak branch with an acorn which is perfectly balanced with a stem showing a Tudor-inspired rose. The edge inscription is "DECUS ET TUTAMEN"( An ornament and a safeguard).


The reverse of the coin design representing Wales, features the leek with a daffodil, their leaves intertwined. The edge inscription id "PLEIDIOL WYF I'M GWALAD" (True I am to my country). 

The obverse of these coins will be the same as before, with the year of issue mentioned as 2013.

The Brilliant Uncirculated (BU) versions in base metal (Nickel Brass) for collectors are already available for booking on the Royal Mint website, while the gold, silver piedfort and silver versions are expected to be released by May 2013. 

Two more coins representing Northern Ireland and Scotland will be released in 2014 completing the quartet.

 Posted on 09.04.2017:

The new 12-sided One Pound UK coin put into circulation on 28.03.17: Salient features: Demonetisation of the presently circulating “round one pound coin” by 15.10.2017:

The story since 1983, when the “Round Pound” was introduced for the first time to replace the One Pound Banknote:

Since 1983 when the round one Pound coin was introduced it has reflected themes of heraldry, Royal Arms, floral symbols as well as important regional landmarks representing England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Throughout its 34 years in circulation, there have been 24 designs in all, created by 8 different designers.

The necessity to go in for a new design with enhanced security features:

There are presently an estimated 45 million pounds worth of counterfeit round coins in circulation which have undermined the “prestige” and confidence of the user public in the presently circulating “round pound”.

Introduction of the new Design 12-sided one pound coin:

On 28.03.2017, a new design 1 pound coin, with the Reverse designed by David Pearce, (selected through a public design competition which commenced in 2014) has been introduced into circulation, which has been described by the Royal Mint as the “most secure coin in the world”.

This is the most innovative coin ever produced by the Royal Mint. A showcase for the latest technology, as well as engraving skills honed over the Royal Mint’s 1,000 year history, this coin has been designed to be fit for the future, using security features that aim to safeguard the denomination for several years ahead.

The 12-sided shape and bimetallic composition are targeted at combating the challenge of sophisticated counterfeiting. The Royal Mint’s patented “High Security Feature” has added to its claims as being the “most secure coin in the world”.

The salient features of the new 12-sided one pound coin:

The new coin exhibits the following interesting features and will be the sole circulating one pound coin once the “round pound” is withdrawn from circulation:
 An image of the Reverse of the new one pound coin. The design is an interpretation of the floral symbols of the UK; the Welsh Leek, the Scottish Thistle, the Northern Irish Shamrock and the English Rose. Below the image on the lower periphery is the denomination of the coin "One Pound" (in words)

i) It has 12 sides, reminiscent of the old three-penny coins.

ii) It is bimetallic – made of two metals – a nickel brass alloy.

iii) It has alternating milled and smooth edges.

iv) User testing has shown that the 12 sides of the new 1 pound coin and the milled edges make it easier to identify by visually challenged persons.

v) It has a latent image – a bit like a hologram, the image changes from a “pound symbol” to the number “1” when the coin is seen from different angles.

vi) It has micro-lettering on both sides of the coin – the first time that micro-lettering like this has appeared on a UK coin.

vii) It also has a hidden high security feature, which replicated Banknote level security for the first time on a coin minted by the Royal Mint.

Viii) The new 1 pound coin features the fifth effigy of the Queen made by Royal Mint Designer Jody Clark.
 An image of the Obverse of the new one pound coin showing the portrait of QE II designed by Jody Clark. His initials "JC" appear below the Queen's neck. Along the periphery are the inscriptions - "2017. ELIZABETH II. D.G. REG. F.D." (meaning "Elizabeth II, By the Grace of God Queen, Defender of the Faith")

ix) The new coin is thinner, lighter and slightly larger than the round pound – it is 2.8 mm thick, has a diameter of 23.03 mm and weighs 8.75 grams.

x) The new pound coin although entering into circulation on 28.03.2017 is dated both 2016 and 2017, as minting of this coin had begun last year in 2016.
xi) On 28.03.2017 itself, 300 million new 1 pound coins have been issued to cash centres across the country to facilitate easy distribution among users.

xii) More than 1.5 billion new coins will be struck by the end of 2017.
A stack of the new 12-sided one pound coin shows the Reverse of the coin 
xiii) The round pounds are being gradually withdrawn from circulation, with around 50 million pieces having been already removed from circulation so far. The Round pounds will cease to be legal tender on 15.10.2017.

xiv) Limited editions of this coin have also been issued in Proof, Silver Proof and Brilliant Uncirculated Qualities for Collectors/Numismatists.
                            Commemorative Proof Quality coins

Trial Pieces:

Interestingly, the Trial pieces for this coin issue were minted in 2015 and about 200,000 pieces were distributed among retailers to help them prepare for the new pound coins’ issuance. These coins are not legal tender. These trial pieces have the same specifications as the regular issues released now and are marked “TRIAL PIECE”.
 The Obverse and Reverse of a Trial Piece issued with the year as 2015. Notice that the Trial piece has an image of the Queen which has been designed by Ian Rank-Broadley, the previous designer of the Queen's portrait. His initials "IRB" appear below the Queen's neck.

Several listings have gone up on sites like eBay where these Trial Pieces are being sold for anywhere between 85 to 220 pounds each by some retailers out to make a quick profit from these specimen pieces.














 

REFERENCE LINKS

 Tarot Card post link: 
http://tarotmysteries.blogspot.in/2012/06/1-reading-tarot-counsellor-and-guardian.html 

Links:

British Crown Dependencies:

1) Specimen Banknotes from the States of Jersey

2) Coinage and Currency from the States of Jersey

3) Currency & Coinage of the Bailiwick of Guernsey

4) Currency & Coinage of Gibraltar : An Overseas Territory of Great Britain

5) Coinage of Gibraltar: (A British Overseas Territory): An Uncirculated Decimal Coin Collection Set minted by the Tower Mint, UK in 2010
  
6) The Isle of Man: An Uncirculated Decimal Coin Collection Set minted by Pobjoy Mint, UK in 2015

7) The Centenary of the ill-fated Titanic (15.04.1912 - 15.04.2012): An Alderney Five Pound Coin Commemorating the Maritime Legend

8) "Man of Steel": A Superman Movie: A set of stamps brought out in 2013 by Jersey post, the States of Jersey, commemorating Henry William Dalgliesh Cavill who played Superman in the Movie

9) Coins & Currency of Bermuda

10) The Bailiwick of Jersey - Presently circulating coinage - Pounds and Pence 

11) St. Helena & Ascension Islands: An Uncirculated Coin Set from 2003 

12) The Legend of the "HMAV Bounty" is interwoven with the heritage of the Pitcairn Islands: An uncirculated coin set from Pitcairn Islands in 2009 depicting the icons/relics of the Bounty minted by the New Zealand Mint 

Famous Battles

1) Bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo and Napoleon's Exile to St. Helena: (Part I): A One Crown Commemorative coin issued by the Ascension Island (minted by Pobjoy Mint UK) 

2) Bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo and Napoleon's Exile to st. Helena: (Part II) 1) A 5 GBP Coin issued by the Royal Mint UK. 2) A"Drie Landen Zilverset" ( ot the "Three Lands Silver set") containing coins issued by the Royal Dutch Mint including coins of Netherlands, Belgium and UK

3) Commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain by issuing a 50 Pence coin by the Royal Mint UK

Gold Coins:
  
1) Gold Sovereigns issued in 2013 & 2014 by MMTC-PAMP in India under licence from the Royal Mint, UK, carrying the "I" Mint Mark

2) Gold Half-Sovereigns minted by MMTC-PAMP in India in 2014 under licence from the Royal Mint UK bearing the "I" Mint Mark 

Silver Coins:

1) A 20 Pound Silver coin minted for the first timr by the royal Mint UK: reverse design carries the famous St. George slaying the dragon design found on Gold Sovereigns 

British India Coinage:

 1) East India Company Quarter Anna Copper Coin which is one of the first issues under the Coinage Act 1835

2) Victoria Coinage: When she was Queen and afterwards Empress

3) Edward VII: King & Emperor  Coinage

4) George V King Emperor Coinage

5) George VI: The last of the British India Emperors Coinage 

Other British Royalty: 

1) Queen Elizabeth II's Diamond Jubilee Celebrations (1952-2012): A Five Pound Commemorative coin issued by the Royal Mint, UK

2) Commemorating Queen Elizabeth II's Coronation in 1953: A Five Pound Coin minted by the Royal Mint UK in 2013, depicting the Imperial State Crown

3) The Royal Coat of Arms of the UK: Great British 2012 Coin Set (Uncirculated) issued by the Royal Mint UK

4) Prince George's Christening Ceremony celebrated with coins issued by the Royal Mint UK in 2013

5) The British Empire:  A Case of Numismatic "segregation": (Guest Post by Rahul Kumar)

6) 1) The Portrait Collection: Various Portraits of Queen Elizabeth II on Coinage 2) The Fourth & Final Circulating coinage of the Portrait designed by Ian Rank-Broadley and the First Edition of the portrait of the Queen made by Jody Clark

 British Coinage:

1) The contribution of the Great British One-Pound coins in keeping alive the historical legends/emblems/heritage of the UK (1983 onwards)

2) Transformation of a Five shilling Coin (Crown) into the UK Twenty-five Pence & then the Five Pound Coin

3) Transformation of the Two Shilling Coin (Florin) Coin into the UK Ten Pence

4) The 350th Anniversary of the Guinea: A Two Pound Coin issued by the Royal Mint UK celebrating the milestone

 Commemorative British Coinage:

 1) Commemorating the Bicentenary of Charles Dickens: A Two pound coin celebrating his literary contributions during the Victorian Era

 2) Commemorating 50 Years of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) - presently called the World Wide Fund for Nature by issue of a Fifty Pence coin by the Royal Mint, UK

3) Coins commemorating London Olympics & Paralympics (2012)

4) Commemorating 150 Years of the London Underground : Two pound Coins minted by the Royal Mint UK, showing the "Roundel" logo and a train emerging from a tunnel 

5) Commemorating the 100th Birth anniversary of Christopher Ironside with his" Royal Arms" design on a 50 Pence coin issued by the Royal Mint, UK 

6) 800th Anniversary of the Magna Carta - the Universal Guidepost to Liberty and Freedom

Inspirations from Scottish History: 

1) The Legend of King Bruce & the Spider on Banknotes

Banknotes from Scotland:
  
1) Commemorating Sir William Arrol and his creation the Forth Rail Bridge by issues of Britain's first ever 5 Pound Polymer Banknote

4 comments:

  1. I have a 1983 pound coin with DD engraved/stamped either side of the queens neck? What is this all about

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hello Samheron1987, This is very interesting. Normally, it is the practice of mints to include the initials of the designer and engraver of the coin designs on both the obverse and reverse sides of the coins (US Mint , for example). To my mind, the 1983 coin obverse design was made by Arnold Machin therefore DD engraved on either side of the Queen's bust is not clear to me. Could I request you to send me an image on my email address for me to study your coin design further?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have The 1985 One Pound with the inscription “PLEIDIOL WYF I’M GWLAD” on the edge. This coin was given to me by a friend who saw that I started collecting coins and I was wondering how could I find out the coin's worth.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Anonymous,
      I have come across the following links which may be of some help:
      1) http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=1985+one+pound&_sacat=0&_from=R40
      2) http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?LH_PrefLoc=2&_nkw=rare+pound+coin+bridge&_rdc=1
      3) http://stores.ebay.co.uk/silverworldcoins2012/British-One-Pound-Coin-/_i.html?rt=nc&_fsub=5318617015&_sid=1116923055&_trksid=p4634.c0.m14.l1513&_pgn=1

      Delete