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Friday, 3 October 2014

151) Commemorative Coins on “60 Years of the Coir Board” (1953-2013) in the Denominations of Rs.60/- and Rs.10/- issued by the Government of India/Reserve Bank of India in 2014:



151) Commemorative Coins on “60 Years of the Coir Board” (1953-2013) in the Denominations of Rs.60/- and Rs.10/- issued by the Government of India/Reserve Bank of India in 2014:

Coir Board of India:

The Coir Board of India is a statutory body established by the Government of India under the Coir Industry Act 1953 for the promotion and development of the Coir (coconut fibre) Industry in India.

Under the Act, the Board was set up by the Government of India and started functioning from 07.07.1954.

The Board has its Head Office in Kochi and its research and training office in Kalavoor, Alappuzha (Alleppey). One of the traditional industries in India, the Coir Industry is presently growing manifold.

The Coir Board has Regional offices in different parts of India, wherever there is a substantial presence of a Coir Industry. The Board strives to promote and conduct research, education and training of processes and personnel in the Coir Industry.

Till 09.05.2007, the Coir Board was functioned as an autonomous body under the control of the Ministry of Agro and Rural Industries, Government of India, but on this date, in terms of a notification, the Ministry of Agro and Rural Industries and the Ministry of Small Scale Industries were merged into a single ministry, the Ministry of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises. As such, the Coir Board now functions under the Union Ministry for Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises.

The Coir Board has taken various schemes under Research and Development viz. modernisation and standardization of ratts, looms and equipments, distribution of standard ratts, extension service in spinning, bleaching, dyeing, Geo-Textile applications etc. including imparting intensive training to persons from the Coir Industry. These schemes contribute in improving the quality of Coir and Coir products and contributing to improving the life-styles of the work-force in the Coir Industry.

Fixing grade standards for Coir products and inspection of Coir Fibre, Coir Yarn and Coir Products are among its several functions.

Coir finds a mention in Ancient Indian history:

Ancient Indian History mentions Coir as the “golden fibre”.

The coconut and its various uses are generally believed to have been introduced in India during the post Vedic period.

In the Hindu Religious text the "Ramayan" written by the sage Valmiki around 3rd century BC, there are references to coconuts in the “Kishkindha Kand” (meaning the “Kishkinda episode” or “chapter”) and the “Aranya Kand” (meaning the “Aranya episode” or “chapter”).

References to the coconut are also found in the “Raghuvamsa of Kalidasa as well as in Sangam Literatures.

Marco Polo, the Portuguese traveller/explorer, during his extensive travels in India in the 13th century has mentioned the coconut as the “Indian Nut”.

Ropes and cordage made from coconut fibre have been in use from ancient times. Indian navigators who sailed to Malaya, Java, China, Australia, Africa and to the Gulf of Arabia centuries ago in ships and later, the one to three-masted “Dhows”, which were primarily built by ship-builders/Indian carpenters from timber grown all along the Kerala coast, had  been using coir ropes to secure their ships cables, fenders and for rigging etc. for centuries. Even several early Arabic writers have chronicled the use of coir in various forms originating in India.

 As there is a proliferation of the Coir Industry in Kerala, there is a school of thought that believes that organised coconut cultivation and processing, as we know it today, started in Kerala only after the arrival of the Portuguese in India (notwithstanding the historical/chronicled references to Coir and Coir products).

Concentration of Coir Industry in Kerala:

Since the 19th century, Coir has been associated with the Indian State of Kerala.

 Located between the Western Ghats on the East and the Arabian Sea on the West, Kerala with its coastal territory slopes and its sandy beaches, has a predominance of coconut trees. Interestingly, the name Kerala is derived from coconut trees – “Kera” in Malayalam language meaning “Coconut” and “Alam” meaning “Land” – thus “Keralam” together means “Land of the Coconut”. In fact everything from Kerala’s culture to its dishes has evolved around the Coconut tree.

Also, the word “coir” comes from the Malayalam word “kayar”.

During ancient times Cochin (present day Kochi in Kerala) was a major trading centre because of its beautiful natural harbour/port and spices. This is evidenced by Chinese fishing nets left behind by traders coming to Cochin during the times of Kublai Khan and the earlier Chinese dynasties. There was a considerable Portuguese and Jewish presence here too – the presence of St Francis Church (an old European Church) and a Jewish synagogue – bear testimony to the importance of the Coir products/raw & finished goods and spice trade over the ages.

Alleppey or Alappuzha is the nerve centre of Kerala’s famous Coir Industry. Here, it is not uncommon to see coconut husks being beaten into fibre for making beautiful mats and other coir products. Traditionally, women are mainly employed in the yarn spinning sector and the men in the product-weaving sector.

In Kerala the Coir industry enjoys the status of a cottage industry giving employment to over a million persons.

Once again, notwithstanding the historical references of Coir and Coir products usage over the centuries, the credit of setting up the first “formal” coir manufacturing factory producing coir mats, matting and floor coverings etc. set up in Alleppey in 1859 goes to an Irish born American national James Darragh. Later several other factories were been established by Indians.

About Coir:

Coir is a versatile natural fibre extracted from the mesocarp tissue or husk of the coconut fruit. Coir essentially is the fibrous material found between the hard internal shell and the outer coat of a coconut. The husk contains 20 % to 30 % fibre of varying length. After grinding the husk, the long fibres are removed and used for various industrial purposes, such as rope and mat making.

The remaining material, composed of short and medium-length fibres as well as pith tissue, is commonly referred to as waste-grade coir. The waste grade coir may be screened to remove part or all of the fibre, and the remaining product is referred to as coir pith.

Generally the fibre is of golden colour when cleaned after removing from the coconut husk hence it is given the name the “Golden Fibre”.

Coir is tough and naturally resistant to sea-water and protects the fruit enough to survive months while floating on ocean currents to be washed up on a sandy shore where it may sprout and grow into a tree, if it can access enough fresh water, because the seed  carries within its shell all the other nutrients need for its nourishment. These qualities make the coconut fibres very useful in floor and outdoor mats, aquarium filters, cordage and rope and garden mulch.

Reasons for preferring Coir:

-      Coir is moth-proof and resistant to fungi and rot.

-      It provides excellent insulation against temperature and sound.

-      It is not easily combustible.

-      It is flame-retardant.

-      It is unaffected by moisture and dampness.

-      It is tough and durable.

-      It is resilient and springs back to shape even after constant use.

-      It is static free.

-      It is easy to clean.

Structure of Coir fibre:

Individual fibre cells are narrow and hollow with thick walls made of cellulose. They are pale when immature but later become hardened and yellowed as a layer of lignin is deposited on their walls. Mature brown coir fibres contain more lignin and less cellulose than fibres such as flax and cotton and so are stronger but less flexible. They are made up of small threads, each less than 0.05 inch (1.30 mm) long and 10 to 20 micrometers in diameter.

White fibre is smoother and finer, but also weaker. The coir fibre is relatively waterproof and is the only natural fibre resistant to damage by salt water.

Green coconuts which are harvested after 6 to 12 months on the plant, contain pliable white fibres. Brown fibre is obtained by harvesting fully mature coconuts when the nutritious layer surrounding the seed is ready to be processed into copra and dessicated coconut. The fibrous layer of the fruit is then separated from the hard shell (manually) by driving the fruit down onto a spike to split it (de-husking). Machines are now available which crush the whole fruit to give the loose fibres.

Brown fibre:

The fibrous husks are soaked in pits or in nets in a slow moving body of water to swell and soften the fibres. The long bristle fibres are separated from the shorter mattress fibres underneath the skin of the nut, a process known as wet-milling.

The mattress fibres are sifted to remove dirt and other rubbish, dried and packed into bales.

Some mattress fibre is allowed to retain more moisture so that it retains its elasticity for “twisted” fibre production. The coir fibre is elastic enough to twist without breaking and it holds a curl as though permanently waved.  Twisting is done by simply making a rope of the hank of fibre and twisting it using a machine or by hand. The longer bristle fibre is washed in clean water and then dried before being tied into bundles or hunks. It is then cleaned and “hackled” by steel combs to straighten the fibres and remove any shorter fibre pieces. Coir bristle fibre can also be bleached and dyed to obtain hunks of different colours.

White Fibre:

White coir which comes from unripe coconuts. The immature husks are suspended in a river or water-filled pit for up to ten months. During this time micro-organisms break down the plant tissues surrounding the fibres to loosen them – this process is known as “retting”.

 Segments of the husk are then beaten by hand to separate out the long fibres, which are then dried and cleaned. Cleaned fibre is ready for spinning into yarn using a simple one-handed system or a spinning wheel.

Uses/Applications:

Brown coir is used in brushes, doormats, floor mats, mattresses and sacking. A small amount is also made into twine. Uses of brown coir also include upholstery padding and horticulture.

Pads of curled brown coir fibre, made by needle-felting (a machine technique that mats the fibres together) are shaped and cut to fill mattresses and for use in erosion control on river banks and hillsides.

A major proportion of brown coir pads are sprayed with rubber latex which bonds the fibres together (rubberised coir) to be used as upholstery padding for the automobile industry. The material is also used for insulation and packaging.

The major use of white coir is in rope manufacture. Mats of woven coir fibre using hand or mechanical looms.  It is also used for making finer brushes, string, rope and fishing nets.

Coir is recommended as substitute for milled peat moss because it is free of bacteria and fungal spores.

Major Producers:

The total world coir fibre production exceeds 250000 tonnes. The coir fibre industry is particularly important in some areas of the developing world. India, mainly the coastal region of Kerala State produces 60 % of the total world supply of white coir fibre. Sri Lanka produces 36 % of the total world brown fibre output. Over 50 % of the coir fibre produced annually throughout the world is consumed in the countries of origin, mainly India.

Mechanisation of the Coir Industry in India:

The Indian Coir Industry is a traditional cottage industry confined to the handloom sector. To meet competition from competing countries in the World market, the Coir Board has taken steps to introduce mechanisation in a gradual manner.

In 1968, Hindustan Coir was established by the Coir Board, which started production on 01.01.1969. Hindustan Coir is equipped with looms along with ancillary winding machines as well as Dobby and Jacquard looms on modern lines.

Training & Development:

The Coir Board has taken steps to develop skilled man-power for the Coir Industry.

The National Coir Training and Design Centre (NCTDC):

In 1965, a premier training Institute, the National Coir Training and Design Centre” (NCTDC) was set up by the Coir Board for this purpose.

Since 1986, The NCTDC is operating out of its own premises/building for conducting its Training courses/programmes/workshops.

The Programmes include programmes on spinning coir yarn on motorised ratts and motorised traditional ratts, programmes for small-scale manufacturers, Artisans training courses, Mahila Coir Yojana (Training programme for women on Coir industry), training on composting coir pith and treatment of Coirret are some such courses conducted by the Centre.

In addition, training is imparted on weaving mats, dyeing coir and weaving matting on semi automatic loom as well as spinning coir yarn, manufacture of frame mats and dyeing of coir etc.

The primary objective of the NCTDC is development of trained manpower and evolving and popularising new designs and patterns for Coir products.

The Central Institute of Coir Technology:

In 1979, the Central Institute of Coir Technology is a research institute of the Coir Board was set up for undertaking research in the utilization of brown coir fibre.

The Core objectives of the Institute:

-      Product development and development of new products from coir fibre,

-      machinery development and standardisation of machinery to improve productivity,

-      testing of Coir and Coir products in the brown coir fibre sector,

-      diversified activities for the coir polymer composites in building materials, automotive, transportation, moulded gift articles and interior decorations in false ceiling, wall panelling and flooring,

-      Process development such as optimisation of process parameters and arriving at suitable machinery for the new product developed,

-      Training and development of skill power in specialised areas of Coir.

-      Formulating Indian standards for the Coir products developed and continuous amendments to the existing standards.

-      Extension service and technical assistance to Coir entrepreneurs.

-      Conducting research and development for the continuous upgradation of processes and mechanisation in processing and production of Coir products.

Coir Geotextiles:

The Coir “Bhoovastra” (or Coir “Geotextiles”) made from nature’s strongest fibre which is extracted from coconut husk is used in the construction of rural roads for better performance and longevity, among other applications viz. soil erosion control in roads, soil consolidation in rural roads, Railway embankments and hill slopes etc .

The use of Mobile Fibre Extraction Machines (SWARNA) for extracting Coir fibres in 10 seconds or less from the husk and ANUGRAHA metallic handlooms specially designed to weave Coir Geotextiles has helped enhance the production of Coir Geotextiles in very little time in rural households.

 These technologies have been designed to be useful to women workers who were employing manual spinning of yarn till some years ago to gain a foothold in the product-weaving sector, considered to be a traditional preserve for men.

Directorate of Coir Development:

The Government of Kerala too has set up the Directorate of Coir Development which is the Agency for implementing all policy decisions of the Government of Kerala in regard to development of the Coir Industry.

The Directorate is the controlling authority of ten Coir Project offices in Kerala located at – Alappuzha, Chirayinkeezhu, Kayamkulam, Kollam, Kozhikode, Kannur, Ponnani, North Paravur, Thrissur and Viacom.

The State Government contributes its resources through the Directorate for facilitating the promotion and development of  the Coir Industry in Kerala.

Recent Trends:

Exports of Coir and Coir products from India during F.Y. 2013-14 reached an all-time high of Rs.14.76 billion (a surge of 32 % over 2012-13) owing to increased demand from China. The Coir exports have increased to 537040 tons as compared to 429501 tons in the previous fiscal (recording a growth of 25%) of which a total of 192110 tons of coir and coir products worth 3.6 billion was exported to China during 2013-14.

International Year of Natural Fibres -2009:

The United Nations General Assembly declared 2009 as the “International Year of Natural Fibres”. This was done for the purpose of co-operation among producers of all natural fibres across the World, so as to emphasise the positive qualities of Natural fibres and to:

a)   Raise awareness and stimulate demand for natural fibres.

b)   Encourage appropriate policy responses from Governments to problems faced by Natural Fibre Industries.

c)   Foster an effective and enduring international partnership among various natural fibres Industries.

d)   Promote efficiency and sustainability of the Natural fibres Industries.

Some examples of plant fibres covered were: cotton, stem (or bast fibres) such as Abaca, Coir, Cotton, Flax, Hemp, Jute, Ramie ans Sisal etc. and animal fibres : Alpaca wool, Angora wool, Camel Hair, Cashmere wool, Mohair, Silk, Wool etc.

The Coir Board worked actively to support the International Year of Natural Fibres – 2009.

The Commemorative Coin:

I have received a two coin Proof set from the Mumbai mint in the denominations of Rs.60/- and Rs.10/- commemorating the Diamond Jubilee of the Coir Board, the details of which are as under:


The Front of the Coin Album containing the “Commemorative Coins. There is the logo/emblem of the Coir Board. Mentioned on the upper periphery of the logo is mentioned “Kayar Board, Bharat Sarkar”

 in Hindi and “Coir Board, Government of India”. Mentioned below the logo is “Kayar Board Ke 60 Varsh (1953-2013)” (in Hindi) and “60 Years of Coir Board (1953-2013)” (in English). On the right bottom corner is mentioned “Proof 2 Coins).




On the second page is given of the Coin Album is given a picture of a Coconut palm and the following narration:

“The Coir industry is an agro-based rural industry providing means of livelihood for more than 7 lakhs of workers in the coconut producing states of the country. The first coir factory for manufacturing coir floor coverings as established in the ancient port town of Alleppey during the year 1859 by an Irish born American Mr. James Darragh and Henry Ismail. Thereafter, other enterprising Europeans have also started coir factories in Alleppey employing thousands of workers. After the Independence, there was a transition in the industry as the Europeans migrated to their homeland. Coir Industry also became a totally decentralised industry.

Based on the representations made by the trade unions, Govt. of Kerala and other interests, the Union Government set up Coir Board under the Coir Industries Act 1953 for the overall development of coir industry in India during the year 1964. Since then, Coir Board has been steering the destiny of coir industry by protecting the interests of various stake holders like coir exporters, coir manufacturers, small scale producers, coir spinners, coir co-operative societies and the public sector undertakings. With the concerted efforts of the Coir Board, it was possible to proliferate the industry in 14 States and Union Territories of the country.

 Due to the dedicated service rendered by Coir Board in the past 6 decades, the Board was able to put the industry in its growth trajectory. In recognition of good works rendered by Coir Board during the past 6 decades, Ministry of Finance, Govt. of India issues this commemorative coin as part of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations.”


 The obverse faces of the 2 coins showing their denominational values Rs.60/- and Rs.10/- as the coins appear in the coin album.




The reverse faces of the two coins as they appear on the coin album.




The Obverse of the Rs 60/- (Rupees Sixty) coin showing the Lion Capitol in the top centre with the words “Satyameva Jayate” (Truth always prevails) in Hindi/Devnagri inscribed below it, below which is the denominational value of the coin preceded by the rupee symbol. On the left periphery is the name of the country “Bharat” (in Hindi/Devnagri) and on the right periphery is mentioned “India” (in English).




The Obverse of the Rs 10/- (Rupees Ten) coin showing the Lion Capitol in the top centre with the words “Satyameva Jayate” (Truth always prevails) in Hindi/Devnagri inscribed below it, below which is the denominational value of the coin preceded by the rupee symbol. On the left periphery is the name of the country “Bharat” (in Hindi/Devnagri) and on the right periphery is mentioned “India” (in English).




The Reverse of the Rs 60/- (Rupees Sixty) coin showing the logo/emblem in the centre. On the upper periphery is mentioned Coir Board Ke 60 Varsh” (in Hindi/Devnagri). Within the inner circle is depicted the logo/emblem pf the Coir Board showing a cross section of a coconut. On top of the logo is mentioned “Diamond Jubilee” in English and below the logo are mentioned the Diamond Jubilee years “1953-2013”. On the extreme bottom is mentioned “60 Years of Coir Board”. Further below is the “M” mint mark of the Mumbai Mint which is reserved for Proof coins minted by the Mumbai Mint.



The Reverse of the Rs 10/- (Rupees Ten) coin showing the logo/emblem in the centre. On the upper periphery is mentioned Coir Board Ke 60 Varsh” (in Hindi/Devnagri). Within the inner circle is depicted the logo/emblem pf the Coir Board showing a cross section of a coconut. On top of the logo is mentioned “Diamond Jubilee” in English and below the logo are mentioned the Diamond Jubilee years “1953-2013”. On the extreme bottom is mentioned “60 Years of Coir Board”. Further below is the “M” mint mark of the Mumbai Mint which is reserved for Proof coins minted by the Mumbai Mint.

The specifications of these two coins are as under:

a)   The Rupees 60 coin:

Shape: Circular;
Diameter/size: 44 mm;
No. of serrations: 200;
Weight: 35 gms.;
Metal composition: Quaternary Alloy (silver: 50%, copper: 40%, nickel: 5%, Zinc: 5%).

b)   The Rupees 10 coin:

Shape: Circular;

Diameter/size: 27 mm;

No. of serrations: Nil;

Weight: 7.71 gms.;

Metal composition: Outer Ring: (Aluminium Bronze): copper: 92%, Aluminium: 6%, nickel: 2 %; Centre Piece: (Cupro-Nickel): Copper: 75%, Nickel: 25%)

Reserve Bank of India has also announced in July 2014, that the Rupees ten coin commemorating the Diamond Jubilee of the Coir Board will be put into general circulation shortly. Those Numismatists who have missed out on the Commemorative Coins sets issued by the Mumbai Mint, will now have a chance to collect a ten rupee coin from general circulation.


Posted on 14.03.2015:

Commemorative Coin issued by the Hyderabad Mint booked in August 2014, received today from the Mint.



The cover of the album on which is shown an image of a coconut tree laden with coconuts. On the top of the album is mentioned “Smarak Sikka” in Hindi and “Commemorative Coin” in English. Also mentioned on this cover is “Kayar Board ke 60 varsh 1953-2013” in Hindi and “60 years of Coir board 1953-2013”. On the bottom right hand corner is the emblem of the Coir Board on which is mentioned “Kayar Board, Bharat Sarkar” (in Hindi) and “Coir Board, Government of India” (in English).



On the second page of the album, inter alia,  is a description of the history of Coir Board which states as follows:

“Coir is the style of life …….. The Coir board was established as a statutory body under the “Coir Industry Act 1953” for the promotion and development of the coir (coconut fibre) industry in India. When established the Coir Industry was mainly concentrated in Kerala. Today the Coir Boards activity is spread across 14 states. The Board is based in Kochi and Alappuzha. The Head Office of the Coir Board is in Ernakulam and research and training office is in Kalavoor, Alappuzha.The Board works for the promotion, research, education and training of the coir industry. The Coir Board functions under the Ministry of MSME. In India about 10 lakh people directly or indirectly are engaged in the coir industry. The Coir Board has worked actively to support the International Year of Natural Fibres.”



Obverse of the Rupees Ten Bimetallic Commemorative coin. In the Centre is the Lion Capitol of Emperor Asoka with the legend “Satyameva Jayate” in Hindi meaning “Truth always Prevails” which is the emblem of the Government of India.



Reverse of the Rupees Ten Bimetallic Commemorative coin. In the centre is cross-section of a ripe coconut. On the upper periphery of the coin is mentioned “Kayar Board ke 60 Varsh’ (in Hindi) and “60 Years of Coir Board” (in English) on the lower periphery. Below this inscription is the “Star” mint mark of the Hyderabad Mint. Above the cross-section of the coconut image is mentioned “Diamond Jubilee” and below the image is mentioned the years 1953-2013”.

The specifications of this coin are:

Denomination: Rs. Ten; Metal Composition:Bi-Metallic: Outer Ring (Aluminium Bronze): Copper: 92%, Aluminium: 6%, Nickel: 2%; Centre-Piece (Cupro-Nickel): Copper: 75%, Nickel: 25%. Dimensions: Diameter: 27 mm; Weight:7.71 gms.

Posted on 01.06.2015:
 Yesterday, I received a Circulation Rs 10/- coin given to me by Krishna Tonpe, who is constantly on the lookout for new commemorative coins for me. This acquisition, now completes my collection of all the Coins issued on the "60 years of the Coir Board" commemoration issued so far:
Reverse of the Rupees Ten Bimetallic Commemorative Circulation coin. In the centre is cross-section of a ripe coconut. On the upper periphery of the coin is mentioned “Kayar Board ke 60 Varsh’ (in Hindi) and “60 Years of Coir Board” (in English) on the lower periphery. Below this inscription is the “Diamond” mint mark of the Mumbai Mint. Above the cross-section of the coconut image is mentioned “Diamond Jubilee” and below the image is mentioned the years 1953-2013”.
 Obverse of the Rupees Ten Bimetallic Commemorative coin. In the Centre is the Lion Capitol of Emperor Asoka with the legend “Satyameva Jayate” in Hindi meaning “Truth always Prevails” which is the emblem of the Government of India.
The specifications of this coin too, are:

Denomination: Rs. Ten; Metal Composition:Bi-Metallic: Outer Ring (Aluminium Bronze): Copper: 92%, Aluminium: 6%, Nickel: 2%; Centre-Piece (Cupro-Nickel): Copper: 75%, Nickel: 25%. Dimensions: Diameter: 27 mm; Weight:7.71 gms.

10 comments:

  1. Hemant Bansal has commented:
    "Very informative. Keep enlightening us with such wonderful gems of information".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Hemant for your encouragement. Really appreciate.

      Delete
  2. Ramchandra Lalingkar has commented:
    "Thanks Rajeev Prasad. Very informative article. It is really wonderful news that GOI has issued coin worth Rs.60/-, though for commemorative purpose".

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    Replies
    1. Thank you very much for your constant appreciation, support & encouragement, Lalingkar sahab . Yes, this is the second 60 rupees coin issued this year after the Commemorative coin on 60 years of the Kolkata mint. I am also expecting a Rs. 25/- coin ( 25 years of the Shree Mata Vaishno Devi Shrine Board) and a Rs.20/- coin (Acharya Tulsi of Jain faith) to be also issued in quaternary alloy (50% silver) this year or beginning next year. RBI have also announced that they will be bringing out a Rs.5/- coin on the "125th Anniversary of Maulana Abul Kalam Azad" sometime this year, so we can expect a Rs.125/- Commemorative silver coin to be issued as well sometime later by either the Kolkata or Mumbai mints. Numismatists are definitely in for a treat in the next year or so as these are all very uncommon denominations.

      Delete
    2. Ramchandra Lalingkar has commented:
      " Very interesting news".

      Delete
  3. Thanks Rajeev Prasad. Very informative article. It is really wonderful news that GOI has issued coin worth Rs.10-, though for commemorative purpose".
    9702030472

    Reply

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your appreciative comment, Naeem. The Rs.10/- circulation coin came to me as a very pleasant surprise.

      Delete
  4. @EatDrinkCoconut has commented (on Twitter):
    "@SumitaChaudhry thanks for posting this enjoyed reading about the history and celebration of coir."
    6:04 PM - 1 Jun 2016







    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @EatDrinkCoconut Thank you so much for reading this post and your comment.

      Delete