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Wednesday, 17 June 2015

193) East Caribbean Currency and Coinage: East Caribbean Dollar and Cents:



193) East Caribbean Currency and Coinage: East Caribbean Dollar and Cents:

The East Caribbean Dollar (EC$) is the currency of 8 of the 9 members of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States, sub-divided into 100 cents.

History of the Islands:

Although, Columbus, during his voyages, claimed some of the islands of the Eastern Caribbean and they were originally colonised by Spain, France and Britain fought them over their possession in the 17th and 18th Centuries, till ultimately, they came to be occupied/controlled by Britain and became a part of British Overseas Territories, which were otherwise, known as “Crown Colonies”.

Until 1955, these islands used British Currency, whereafter, the “Currency/Coinage of theBritish East Caribbean Territories” was introduced.

The standard issues of the British East Caribbean Territories had a crowned portrait of Queen Elizabeth II on the Obverse faces and numerals on 1,2, 5 and 10 cents denomination coins, and Columbus’ Flagship, the Santa Maria along with the numeral (on 10 cent coins) on the Reverse of these denominations. The 50 cents coin had Neptune driving a sea chariot on the Reverse.

In 1958, these Crown Colonies of the Eastern Caribbean, joined together to form the “West Indies Federation” (formerly referred to as the “British West Indies” or the “Beewee” – a nickname given to the British West Indies), but when the Federation broke up, these islands were granted Associate Statehood with local self-government, as a preliminary step towards their achieving full independence within the British Commonwealth.

Historical Evolution of the East Caribbean Currency & Coinage:

In 1704, Queen Anne’s Proclamation introduced the Gold Standard to the group of Islands referred to as the British West Indies.

In 1822, the British Government introduced ¼, 1/8 and 1/16 fractional “Anchor dollars” for circulation in Mauritius and the British West Indies.

In 1825, there was an attempt to introduce British sterling silver coinage to the Colonies through an Imperial Order-in Council. This was inspired by the fact that Mexico (where the most popular Spanish Gold and silver coins were minted), was in upheaval, with the Spanish occupiers having been overthrown by an Armed Insurgency by the Mexicans, who had gained complete Independence from Spain in 1821. The War had led to the looting of Mexican silver by the fleeing Spaniards, as such, the output of silver coins from the Mint of Mexico/Insurgent Mints had drastically reduced. It is believed that the last of the Spanish dollars was minted at Potosi Mint in 1825.

Nevertheless, until the late 1870s, Spanish silver pieces of eight minted in the Mint of Mexico, which circulated along with British coinage, continued to be the most popular coin in circulation all over the islands.

 As a result, the 1825 British Order –in- Council proved to be a non-starter/failure, primarily, due to an unrealistic exchange rate of one Spanish dollar ($1) being placed at an exchange value of 4 shillings and 4 pence.

The reality of the rating between the dollar and the pound was based on the silver content of the Spanish pieces of eight as compared to the gold content of the British Gold Sovereign. In Jamaica, Bermuda and British Honduras, the exchange rate of 1 Spanish dollar to 4 British shillings was found to be more popular with the users in view of the more reasonable exchange rate.

In 1838, a second Imperial Order-in–Council was passed in which the Exchange rate of one Spanish dollar was placed at 4 shillings 2 pence, which was a more reasonable exchange rate of exchange than before. Nevertheless, once again, the Spanish/Mexican dollar still remained the most popular coin in circulation.

In keeping with the Second Order-in-Council, the British West Indian territories began to enact legislation for the purpose of aligning the local currencies in line with the values of the British Pound defined in the Second Order-in-Council.

Meanwhile, in 1851 gold was discovered in Australia in huge amounts and silver began to lose its “attraction” as a favoured precious metal coin, in favour of gold coins.

In 1873, legislation was passed in individual territories to demonetise the Spanish/Mexican silver dollars. Even though the British coinage was also silver, it was based on fractions of the Gold Sovereign, therefore, its value was based on the Gold Standard. Gradually, the British Pound gained substantial acceptance all over the West Indies and by the beginning of 1880s had been accepted as a medium of exchange in place of the Spanish dollar.

In 1946, based on a decision taken in a West Indies Currency Conference, Barbados, British Guiana, the Leeward Islands, Trinidad and Tobago and the Windward Islands resolved to establish a Unified Decimal Currency System based on a West Indian dollar (BWI$), which would replace the current arrangement of having three different Boards of Commissioners of Currency – established for Barbados & Leeward and Windward Islands, British Guiana and Trinidad and Tobago.

In 1949, the dollar system of accounts was formalised for British Guiana and the Eastern Caribbean territories, by introducing the “British West Indies dollar” (BWI$) – nicknamed as the “Beewee dollar” – at the prevailing exchange rate of BWI$ 4.80 to a Pound Sterling.

In 1950, the British Caribbean Currency Board (BCCB) was set up in Trinidad which was tasked with issuing Banknotes and coins under the Unified Decimal Currency System for the member countries.

In 1951, the British Virgin Islands joined the arrangement, but withdrew in 1961, adopting the US dollar instead.

By 1955, decimal coins denominated in cents, replaced the Pound Sterling coins.

In 1958, the West Indies Federation came into existence with the BWI$ as its currency. However, Jamaica, although a member of the Federation, retained the Jamaican Pound, although it had adopted the BWI$ formally in 1954 as legal tender.

In 1964, Jamaica did away with the legal tender status of the BWI$, while Trinidad and Tobago withdrew from the Currency Union. In the same year the BCCB was shifted to Barbados for operational convenience.

In 1965, as the West Indies Federation for all practical purposes stood dissolved/defunct, the BWI$ was replaced at par with the East Caribbean dollar, while the BCCB was replaced by the Eastern Caribbean Currency Authority (ECCA).

In 1966, British Guiana withdrew from this arrangement while in 1968, Grenada joined the Union.

In 1972, Barbados left the Currency Union. In the same year, the ECCA Headquarters were shifted to St Kitts from Barbados, as Barbados had left the arrangement.

Between 1965 and 1983, the Eastern Caribbean Currency Authority issued EC$, with Banknotes being issued from 1965 onwards and Coins from 1981.

On 05.07.1983, through an agreement signed at Port of Spain, the Eastern Caribbean Currency Authority was replaced by the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB) which still supervises the issue of EC$ currency from its Headquarters based at Basseterre in Saint Kitts and Nevis.

The Front of all the Banknotes has a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II, as do the Obverses of all coins issued for circulation among the members of the OEC. This is because, she is still the Head of all the States and Territories using the EC$ except for Dominica which is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations which recognises the Queen as the Head of the Commonwealth.

In 1980, the appellation “British” was dropped and the currency/coinage came to be called “East Caribbean Territories” currency/coinage.

The  Coins of the East Caribbean Territories have a bust of Queen Elizabeth II on the Obverse and numerals 1, 2 and 5 on the smaller denomination coins flanked by a laurel branch on either side while the higher denomination coins had a depiction of the Santa Maria (10 and 25 cents and $1 coins) on the Reverse faces. Similarly, on Banknotes, Queen Elizabeth’s effigy appears on the Banknotes, in her capacity as the Head of the Commonwealth of Nations which recognises the Queen as the Head of the Commonwealth.

The Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB):

The Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB) was established in October 1983.

It is the Monetary Authority to the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union which is also a part of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OEC) of which – Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia and St. Vincent and the Grenadines (all six are independent states) and Anguilla and Montserrat (both are British Overseas Territories (BOTs) are all members of. The ninth OEC member is the British Virgin Islands, which is the only exception, which uses the US Dollar).

The Currency Union is supervised by the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB) and has a common currency – the East Caribbean Dollar.

The ECCB was established with the primary objective to maintain stability of the East Caribbean dollar (EC$) and the integrity of the Banking system so as to act as a facilitator for balanced growth and development of member countries.

Previous members:

Till 1966 and 1972, British Guiana and Barbados were both members of the OEC respectively, whereafter, they have their own independent currencies.

Trinidad and Tobago was a member of the predecessor Union to the OEC, the British West Indies Currency Union (BWICU) but withdrew from it in 1964.

On 29.01.2009, the ECCB issued a new one dollar commemorative coin to celebrate the Bank’s 25th anniversary on 01.10.2008. The coin was round with a ribbed edge and depicted Queen Elizabeth II’s effigy on the Obverse and the Central Bank’s motto “TOGETHER WE STAND” on the Reverse.

Evolution of the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank issued Banknotes:

Between 1950 and 1965, Banknotes were issued by the British Caribbean Currency Board (BCCB).

 In 1965, the East Caribbean Dollar replaced the British West Indies Dollar.

The Eastern Caribbean Currency Authority circulated East Caribbean Banknotes in the denominations of 1, 5, 20 and 100 dollars. These Banknotes on the front depicted the 1956 portrait of Queen Elizabeth II in the regalia of the Order of the Garter, which was designed by Pietro Annigoni.

On 15.11.1984, the first issues of the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank in the denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20 and 100 dollars to commemorate the ECCB’s first Anniversary were circulated. These Banknotes contained a bar code and country coded letterings (which formed a part of the serial numbers on the Banknotes), of the country they were issued for.

In 1989, the last of the 1 dollar Banknotes were issued.

In October 1993, 50 dollar denomination Banknotes were issued to mark the Bank’s 10th Anniversary celebrations.

On 01.04.2008, a new series of Banknotes was issued but without having separate country code letterings and the bar code.

In 2012, another new Series of Banknotes was issued which had Braille features, so as to assist the visually challenged persons/visually impaired persons to easily identify the higher denomination Banknotes – 10, 20, 50 and 100 dollars. The raised Braille characters on these Banknotes depicted a Cricket theme in the form of cricket balls and stumps.

Banknote Issues Series I (1984):

The Eastern Caribbean Banknotes depicted the same themes as the ECCA Banknotes.

These were assigned the country codes – U for Anguilla, A for Antigua and Barbuda, D for Commonwealth of Dominica, G for Grenada, M for Montserrat, K for St. Kitts and Nevis, L for Saint Lucia and V for St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

The Chief Security Features of this Series were the embedded thread on the right side of the Banknote and the profile watermark of the Queen along with the lithographic and intaglio print.

Banknote Issues Series II (1993):

Notable Features of the Banknotes of Series II:

-      The $ 50 Banknote was issued in October 1993 to mark the Bank’s 10th Anniversary celebrations.

-      The Front of the Banknote was redesigned to feature the new ECCB Headquarters along with the Queen’s effigy. On the Back were depicted wildlife and cultural icons or National landmarks of each Island.

-      Interestingly, the see-through element of the larger fish at the bottom left hand corner of the Front of the Banknotes was realigned so that the fish on the Back fitted exactly within the outline of the fish on the Front.

-      Also, a compass rose in silver metallic ink was embedded on the Back and second and third intaglio colours were incorporated into the main colour scheme.

-      In addition, a barcode unique to each ECCB member country was added at the bottom left hand side of the Front of the Banknotes. This machine readable element facilitated easy identification of the original country to which the Banknotes were issued.

Individual Banknote Descriptions:



The Front of a Five Dollar Banknote, showing an effigy of Queen Elizabeth II, a turtle, a bird and the see-through fish element. This Series exhibits the Bar Code of the country for which it was issued and the Serial number ends in “A” indicating that this Banknote was issued on behalf of Antigua and Barbuda.



The Back of the above Banknote showing the Admiral’s house in Antigua & Barbuda and the Trafalgar falls in Dominica. In the centre is a map of the participating countries – Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, St. Christopher & Nevis, Montserrat, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines and Grenada – for which the ECCB issues common Banknotes.

On the Back of the 5 Dollar Banknote are two themes, one is the Admiral’s House in Antigua and Barbuda and the other is, Trafalgar Falls in Dominica.



Trafalgar Falls: Located about 1.5 miles North-East of the village of Trafalgar, Trafalgar Falls are two tropical twin waterfalls which empty out into a large fresh-water lake below. The Falls are located on the West side of the Island about three and a half miles from Roseau. The scenery is still lush green and tourists are treated to a Freshwater Hiking trail which is quite long and adventurous, Waitukubuli Trail, Middleham Falls Hiking trail, Rainforest Aerial Tram, Papillote Tropical Gardens, Valley of Desolation etc. as the other attractions.
The Back of a 10 Dollar Banknote. In the centre is a map of the participating countries – Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, St. Christopher & Nevis, Montserrat, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines and Grenada – for which the ECCB issues common Banknotes.


 On the Back of the 10 Dollar Banknote are two themes, one is the Warspite in Anguilla and the other is the Admiralty Bay in St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

The Warspite: Boat races, the Rules of boat racing and the boats themselves are unique to the Island of Anguilla. Traditional schooners participate in these races, having “oversized” sails like giant wings. The Boat races have been a part of Anguilla’s tradition ever since the early 1900s. The Races are a hangover from a tradition which began a couple of centuries ago, when Anguilla’s Plantations suffered a failure, leading to the people taking to the Seas for employment on neighbouring Islands, particularly in the cane plantations of the Dominican Republic. The return trips to Anguilla became fiercely competed “unofficial” races in speed.

Several schooners would vie with one another, even across rough Seas for the “glory” of who got home first to Road Bay.

In 1918, the first organised Boat race was held as part of the celebrations to mark the end of World War I. This race consisting of fishing boats was held in Crocus Bay and was won by “Repel”. Boat Races are a kind of festival in Anguilla and are held throughout the spring and summer accompanied by barbecues, music and dancing with spectators and participants coming out in traditional Island attire.

In 1930, a race of historic proportions was held, in which two of Anguilla’s most famous schooners the “Warspite” and the “Ismay” were on return from the Dominican Republic, along with several other boats coming back home.

On Sunday morning, after five days of hard sailing, the schooners were sighted west of Dog Island, full sail ahead towards Road Bay. All the while, the church was in session at Bethel Methodist on top of the hill surrounding Road Bay. The excitement of the parishioners on sighting the racing boats was so unbearable, that the church emptied out within minutes, with everyone, including the Minister who was giving the sermon, running out to cheer their favourite boat to “win”.



A $10 Anguilla Post stamp showing the schooner “Warspite” at full sail in their Stamp Series titled “Past Sailing Vessels of Anguilla”.

“Spite” is a common name for the green woodpecker, thereby the name suggests that the ship named Warspite would “poke holes” in the enemy’s “wooden” ship’s hulls. Also, for several years a woodpecker was used as the ship’s crest.

Interestingly, eight Warships of the Royal Navy of the UK have been named Warspite – the 29-gun “English galleon Warspite” (1596), the 70 Gun “HMS Warspite”, (1666), the 74 Gun “HMS Warspite” (1758), the 76 Gun “HMS Warspite” (1807), the 120 Gun “HMS Warspite” (1833), the Astraea-class Cruiser “HMS Warspite” (1893), the battleship “HMS Warspite” (1913) and a nuclear powered submarine “HMS Warspite (1965) .
 The Back of a 20 dollar Banknote.In the centre is a map of the participating countries – Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, St. Christopher & Nevis, Montserrat, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines and Grenada – for which the ECCB issues common Banknotes.        


On the Back of the 20 Dollar Banknote are two themes, one is the Government House in Montserrat and the other is the Nutmeg in Grenada.



The Back of a 50 dollar Banknote issued in 2012, which has remained the same since the 1993 issues, placed here for illustration purposes. In the centre is a map of the participating countries – Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, St. Christopher & Nevis, Montserrat, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines and Grenada – for which the ECCB issues common Banknotes.

On the Back of the 50 Dollar Banknote are two themes, one is Les Pitons in St. Lucia and the other is the Brimstone Hill in St. Kitts and Nevis.





Les Pitons: The Pitons (meaning “Peaks” in French) are two mountainous volcanic spires, located near the towns of Soufriere and Choiseul on the South-western coast, in St. Lucia. The “Gros Piton” (meaning “Large Piton”) is about 771 metres (or 2530 feet) high and the “Petit Piton” (meaning “Small Piton”) is about 743 metres (or 2438 feet) high. They are linked by the “Piton Mitan” ridge.

The Pitons are part of a volcanic complex, known to geologists as the Soufriere Volcanic Centre, which is the remnant of one or more huge collapsed stratovolcanos. The Marine Management Area is a coastal strip 11 km long and about 1 km wide.

The coral reefs, which cover almost 60% of the marine Area, are healthy and diverse.

The area is a multiple-use management system where Agriculture, Artisan fishing, human settlement of about 1500 residents and tourism all flourish together.  At least 148 plant species have been recorded on Gros Piton and 97 on Petit Piton. Among these are several endemic or rare plants, including 8 rare species of trees. Some bird species, including five endemics, are known from Gros Pitons, along with indigenous rodents, opossum, bats, reptiles and amphibians.

St Lucia’s local beer brand is named after the Pitons.

In 2004, the Pitons Management Area was declared a World Heritage Site and span a total area of 2909 ha (or 7190 acres) in size



Brimstone Hill in Saint Kitts: The word Brimstone means “Sulphur”.

It is a well preserved fortress on a hill on the Island of St. Kitts and is a well-preserved example of 17th and 18th century military architecture in the Caribbean and the Americas. Designed by the British and built intermittently by African slave labour over about 100 years, the fortress is a testimony to the European expansion, the African slave trade and the emergence of new societies in the Caribbean. The main area of the Park contains Fort George, a massive masonry structure on one of the twin peaks that dominate the complex and is in excellent condition. It is the earliest surviving example of the type of fortification termed as the “polygonal system”.

In 1690, cannon were first mounted on Brimstone hill when the British used them to recapture Fort Charles from the French.

In 1782, the French Admiral Comte Francois Joseph Paul de Grasse laid siege to the Fort and guns were brought from Fort Charles and several other fortifications around St. Kitts. The adjacent Island of Nevis surrendered to the French easily, while the British garrison surrendered after a month-long siege.

In 1783, the treaty of Paris saw St. Kitts and Brimstone hill being returned to the British, who held it continuously thereafter.

 In 1853, the fortress was abandoned as a result of British Defence cuts. The wooden buildings were auctioned and dismantled and masonry buildings were plundered for their cut stone.

Since 1999, Brimstone Hill Fortress National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.



On the Back of the 100 Dollar Banknote are two themes, one is the ECCB Headquarters and the other is Sir William Arthur Lewis.



Sir William Arthur Lewis (23.01.1915 – 15.06.1991): He was a St. Lucian economist widely acclaimed for his contributions in the field of Economics.

His Article titled “Economic Development with unlimited Supplies of Labour” which was published in 1954 was his most influential development economics article in which he introduced the “Dual Sector Model” or the “Lewis Model”. His theories have been credited with the economic development in China over the past few decades.

In 1955, he published “The Theory of Economic Growth” in which he put forth a concept of providing an appropriate framework for studying economic development driven by a combination of “curiosity and practical need”.

In 1979, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics.

In 1985, Sir Arthur Lewis Community College named in his honour, was set up and is the only Community College in Saint Lucia.

Banknote Issues Series III (1995):

In this Series, the wordings and numerals of the various denominations were made clearer against the background and further enhanced with minor colour changes.

The colour of the $50 Banknote was changed to Brown Orange to differentiate it from the $10 Banknote.

Banknote Issues Series IV (2000):

This Series introduced a full-faced image watermark of Queen Elizabeth II. This series also displayed a new Electrotype feature which read ECCB to the left hand side of the watermark.



In addition, a golden iridescent image of fishes was embedded on the Back of the Banknotes.

A gold foil intaglio overprint and a 1.20 mm Windowed Security Thread which were earlier added to the 100 Dollar denomination in 1998 were incorporated into the other Banknotes of this Series.

Banknote Issues Series V (2004):

In this Series, the Security thread was increased to a 2 mm Windowed Facet. When the Banknotes are viewed from the Front under reflected ultraviolet light, the letters “ECCB” and the denomination are clearly visible.

A reflective silver foil with intanglio overprint framed with the letters “ECCB” and the denomination replaced the plain gold filigree.

Banknote Issues Series VI (2008):

In this Series, the Country Codes were removed from the Serial number which was modified to include a double alpha character prefix.

The Barcodes were also removed and the Fish on the Front bottom left hand side made more prominent. All the other existing Security Features remained unchanged.

Banknote Issues Series VII (2012):

In 2012, another new Series of Banknotes was issued which had Braille features, so as to assist the visually challenged persons/visually impaired persons to easily identify the higher denomination Banknotes – 10, 20, 50 and 100 dollars. The raised Braille characters on these Banknotes depicted a Cricket theme in the form of cricket balls and stumps
                        The Front of a 10 Dollar banknote.
-      On the 10 Dollar Banknote, there is a single upright stump and a single dislodged bail by a bowled ball.
                      The Front of a 20 dollar Banknote

-      On the 20 Dollar Banknote, there are two upright stumps with one bail and a bowled ball outside the leg-stump to a right-handed batsman.




                    The Front of a 50 dollar Banknote
 On the 50 Dollar Banknote, there are two visible upright stumps, with the two bails having been dislodged by a bowled cricket ball.

-      On the 100 Dollar Banknote, there are three upright stumps on which are placed two bails in the normal manner in which they are placed on a cricket field during play.

In addition, this Series reintroduced a one dollar Banknote for St. Vincent and the Grenadines in which the Serial number ends with the country code “V”.

All the other features of the Banknotes, including the profile watermark of Queen Elizabeth II, Security features and images have remained the same as in the earlier Series.

Security Features incorporated on ECCB Banknote issues:

-      See Through Feature: There is a fish at the bottom left hand corner on the front of the banknotes. When the banknotes are help up to the light, parts of the fish fill in, as areas on the back of the banknote line up perfectly with the Front.

-      Watermark: There is a watermark depicting Queen Elizabeth II on each of the Banknotes. The watermark appears three-dimensional, when the Banknote is held up to light.
 Full faced image Watermark of Queen Elizabeth II introduced in the 2000 Banknote series.

-      Security thread: The Security thread has been upgraded. When the Banknote is viewed from the front under reflected UV light, the letters ECCB and the denominational value of the Banknote are clearly visible in yellow, against a blue background. A second Security thread has also been added. This is a narrow, continuous black line, to the left of the Queen’s portrait.

-      Electrotype: The Electrotype reads “ECCB” and enhances the visibility and security of the traditional Watermark.

-      Intaglio over Foil: The Banknotes bear a highly reflective Foil which shows the denomination. The letters ECCB and the denomination can be seen in small print around the Foil. The presence of Intaglio enhances the Security of the Banknotes.
 A reflective silver foil with "ECCB" and the denomination replaced the plain gold filigree  - introduced in the 2004 Series of Banknotes.

-      Silver Metallic Ink: A compass rose is printed in silver coloured ink on the Back of the banknotes. The ink gives a metallic lustre to the image and enhances its appearance.

-      Iridescent print: On the Back of the banknotes, there is an area printed with a special iridescent ink, which has a golden sheen. If one moves the Banknote around in the light, one can see the image of several fishes which appear and disappear as the Banknote is moved.
   Golden iridescent images of fishes, introduced in the 2000 Banknote Series.

-      Novel Numbering: Each Banknote bears a unique serial number, which is printed vertically on the left hand side of the Banknote and horizontally in a “novel” numbering style on the right hand side.

All Series of Banknotes issued by the ECCB are legal tender:

All Series of Banknotes issued from 1984 onwards are legal tender and still in circulation and are replaced in the normal course through wear and tear over time, with use.

Coins issued by the East Caribbean Central Bank:

Until 1981, the Coins of the British West Indies dollar (BWI$) were circulating.

In 1981, a new Series of coins was circulated in the denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 25 Cents and one Dollar (Aluminium Bronze).

In 1989, the one dollar Aluminium Bronze coin which was round in shape was replaced by a decagonal (ten-sided) cupro-nickel coin.



The Reverses of the various denominations of coins issued from 1981 to 1989.

In 2002, a new Series of Coins having the same denominations as before was introduced referred to as the 2002 Series:

Similarities and distinctive features on the coins of various denominations of the 2002 Series:

-      The Obverses of all these coins depicts a recent portrait of Queen Elizabeth II designed by Ian-Rank Broadley.

-      The one cent and ten cent coins are similar in size, but can be easily distinguished since the weight of the ten cent coin is about two and a half times the weight of the one cent coin.

Also, the one cent coin has a smooth edge while the ten cent coin has a ribbed edge. The numeral “1” on the one cent coin is raised and can be easily felt in the centre between the crossed palm design while the ten cent coin has the numeral “10” on either side of the ship.

-      Similarly, the five cent and twenty-five cent coins are about the same size, but the twenty-five cent coin is almost four times heavier than the five cent coin.

The five-cent coin has a smooth edge and the numeral “5” is raised between the crossed palms, while the twenty-five cent coin has a ribbed edge and the numeral “25” on either side of the ship.

-      Also, the features on the one, two and five cent coins are similar, but have different weights and sizes.

-      The one dollar coin is the largest and heaviest of all the rest, and has a distinctive edge which has alternate smooth and ribbed sections.

-      The Reverses of all these coins depicted the denomination/value of the coin together with the inscription “East Caribbean States” and the year of minting.

Other features of individual coin denominations:



In addition, on the Reverse, the one cent coin is depicted two crossed Palm Branches on either side of the numeral “1.

The specifications of this coin are as under:

Diameter/Size: 18.42 mm; Shape: Round; Metal Composition: Aluminium; Weight: 1.03 gms; Edge: Plain.



In addition, on the Reverse, of the two cent coin is depicted a two crossed Palm Branches on either side of the numeral “2.

The specifications of this coin are as under:

Diameter/Size: 21.46 mm; Shape: Round; Metal Composition: Aluminium; Weight: 1.42 gms; Edge: Plain.



In addition, on the Reverse, of the five cent coin is depicted a two crossed Palm Branches on either side of the numeral “5.

The specifications of this coin are as under:

Diameter/Size: 23.11 mm; Shape: Round; Metal Composition: Aluminium; Weight: 1.74 gms; Edge: Plain.



In addition, on the Reverse, of the ten cent coin is depicted Francis Drake’s ship, the Golden Hind. The number “10” is on either side of the ship.

The specifications of this coin are as under:

Diameter/Size: 18.06 mm; Shape: Round; Metal Composition: Cupro-nickel; Weight: 2.59 gms; Edge: Ribbed.



In addition, on the Reverse, of the twenty-five cent coin is depicted Francis Drake’s ship, the Golden Hind.

The specifications of this coin are as under:

Diameter/Size: 23.98 mm; Shape: Round; Metal Composition: Cupro-nickel; Weight: 6.48 gms; Edge: Ribbed.



In addition, on the Reverse, of the one dollar coin is depicted Francis Drake’s ship, the Golden Hind.

The specifications of this coin are as under:

Diameter/Size: 26.50 mm; Shape: Round; Metal Composition: Cupro-nickel; Weight: 7.98 gms; Edge: Alternate Smooth and Ribbed.








(The Banknotes shown here for illustration purposes are from the collection of Jayant Biswas. Post researched and written and Banknotes scanned by Rajeev Prasad).

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