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Friday, 17 March 2017

463) “Lion Daalder”: Commemorating the 400th Anniversary of the Lion Daalder issued by the Utrecht Provincial Mint in 1617: By Reminting the Lion Daalder as Gold and Silver Bullion coins by the Royal Dutch Mint as a Collector’s item:



463) “Lion Daalder”: Commemorating the 400th Anniversary of the Lion Daalder issued by the Utrecht Provincial Mint in 1617: By Reminting the Lion Daalder as Gold and Silver Bullion coins by the Royal Dutch Mint as a Collector’s item:

The Royal Dutch Mint has brought out new silver and gold one ounce coins, the designs of which are inspired by one of the most well-known and popular trade coins of the late 16th century – the famed “Lion Daalder”.
 The 2017 "Lion Daalder" Gold restrike commemorates the 400th Anniversary of the Lion Daalder issued by the Utrecht Provincial Mint in 1617 and is shown against the background of a bridge on the old canal (Oudegracht) in Central Utrecht town .

The famed “Lion Daalder” (or “Leeuwendaalder”) was first minted by the Province of Holland in 1575 as a means of increasing trade between their numerous trading ports and out-posts from Asia to the Americas, Africa to Australia, and several places in between.

These popular coins were in turn based on an even more popular coin – the “Joachimsthaler” of Bohemia which was first minted in 1519.

It made sense for the new Dutch Provincial coin (whose name “Daalder” was a derivative of the word “Thaler”) to resemble the well-known Joachimsthaler coins so that Dutch traders could benefit from the popularity and trust enjoyed by the Joachimsthaler coinsboth locally and internationally.

The early Daalders were cut out of silver planchets so that they were not perfectly round and were relatively thin, so their strike was not very detailed and the images on both sides were less visible than desired. In time, these coins improved in both quality and in reputation.

With a weight of 26.79 grams of .750 fine silver, the “Lion Daalder” was also popular in the Dutch East Indies, as well as, in the Dutch New Netherlands Colony (present day New York).

After the British became the dominant power in the New World around 1816, the “Lion Daalder” remained in circulation with an exchange value of 4 shillings and 6 pence. Besides the popularity of the Spanish “pieces of eight” (or “8-Reales” Silver Coin) which was also widely circulated in the United States from the 1700s, there is no doubt that the “Lion Daalder” greatly influenced the American silver coinage – especially the name of the new country’s currency – the “dollar”, which was first minted in 1794.

During the mid-17th century, the Leewendaalder became so widely used and recognised worldwide, it made many local coins go out of their own markets. Aside from the Balkan countries, the “Lion Daalder” was the standard form of commerce in regions and states such as Anatolia, Syria, Egypt and North-west Africa for over a century.

It was only in 1713, when the Leewendaalder was no longer minted, that it was finally surpassed by the Maria Theresa Thaler from 1751 onwards. Despite its lack of production, the Leewendaalder remained legal tender for some time in the Levant.

The first modern Lion Daalder re-strikes are based on the on the design originally issued in Utrecht in 1617 and mark the 400th Anniversary of this particular Provincial issue.


On the Obverse of the Lion Daalder Silver restrike is depicted a standing knight. In front of his legs rests a shield bearing a lion rampant (standing on its hind legs). This Lion image is found on both the Dutch and Belgian Coats of arms.

Within two circles of beadwork around the periphery is the inscription “MO.ARG.PRO.CONFOE.BELG.” (abbreviation for “MONETA ARGENTEA PROVINCIARUM CONFOEDERATUM BELGICARUM”, in English translated as “silver money of the Province of the Netherlands”, followed by the letters “TRA” (which represents the Province of Utrecht).
 On the Reverse of the Lion Daalder Silver restrike is depicted the same heraldic lion which appears on the knight’s shield on the Obverse in a larger size. Enclosed in two circles of beadwork around the periphery is inscribed the motto of the United Provinces – “COFIDENS. DNO. NON. MOVETVR.” (meaning “Who trusts in the Lord is not moved” DNO being an abbreviation of “Domino” or “Lord”). The year of issue is marked as “2017”. Towards the lower right periphery is given the silver composition of the coin “.9999”.

The specifications of the Silver restrikes are:

Coin one: (smaller coin):

Denomination: Daalder; Metallic Composition: .9999 Silver; Weight: 31.1 grams; Diameter: 38.7 mm; Coin Quality: Proof; Mintage Limit: 5,000 pieces.

Coin two: (larger coin):

Denomination: Daalder; Metallic Composition: .9999 Silver; Weight: 62.2 grams; Diameter: 38.7 mm; Coin Quality: Proof; Mintage Limit: 200 pieces. 
 On the Obverse of the Lion Daalder Gold restrike is depicted a standing knight. In front of his legs rests a shield bearing a lion rampant (standing on its hind legs). This Lion image is found on both the Dutch and Belgian Coats of arms.

Within two circles of beadwork around the periphery is the inscription “MO.ARG.PRO.CONFOE.BELG.” (abbreviation for “MONETA ARGENTEA PROVINCIARUM CONFOEDERATUM BELGICARUM”, in English translated as “silver money of the Province of the Netherlands”, followed by the letters “TRA” (which represents the Province of Utrecht).

On the Reverse of the Lion Daalder Gold restrike is depicted the same heraldic lion which appears on the knight’s shield on the Obverse in a larger size. Enclosed in two circles of beadwork around the periphery is inscribed the motto of the United Provinces – “COFIDENS. DNO. NON. MOVETVR.” (meaning “Who trusts in the Lord is not moved” DNO being an abbreviation of “Domino” or “Lord”). The year of issue is marked as “2017”. Towards the lower right periphery is given the silver composition of the coin “.9999”.

The specifications of the Gold restrikes are:

Coin one: (smaller coin):

Denomination: Daalder; Metallic Composition: .9999 Gold; Weight: 31.1 grams; Diameter: 38.7 mm; Coin Quality: Proof; Mintage Limit: 100 pieces.

Coin two: (larger coin):

Denomination: Daalder; Metallic Composition: .9999 Gold; Weight: 62.2 grams; Diameter: 38.7 mm; Coin Quality: Proof; Mintage Limit: 10 pieces. 
The Restrikes are inspired by the original 1617 coins made at Utrecht in 1617

 The Obverse of the 1617 "Lion Daalder" strikes from Utrecht Province
The Reverse of the 1617 "Lion Daalder" strikes from Utrecht Province



 Links:
 1) Comprehensive history of the Dollar illustrated on a Kilo coin minted by Fabrica Nacional de Moneda y Timbre (FNMT) in association with the Real Casa de la Moneda on 29.05.2017

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